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Full text of "The Stagecoach"

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THE STAGE COACH 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE STAGE COACH STAFF 




VOLUME XXIX 
1927 



YEAR BOOK OF THE STUDENTS 

SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



m 





Dedication 

pO those who have always loved us, who always 
will; to those who always share our sorrows and 
our joys; to those to whom we owe all that we are, and 
all that we hope to he; we, the Class of nineteen twenty- 
seven, with the deepest respect and love do dedicate this, 
the twenty-ninth yearbook of St. Mary's 

TO 
OUR MOTHERS AND FATHERS 




ra 













3n jWemortam 



MISS CLARA FENNER 



Six 




LURNillVE 




Alma Mater 

Tune: "Belive Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms 

ST. MARY'S ! Wherever thy (laughters may he 
They love they high praise to sing, 
And to tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 
Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar ; out of reach of thy name 
Afar out of sight of thy grove, 

But the thought of Saint Mary's aye kindles a flame 
Of sweet recollections and love. 



■ 5£ji . 




Beloved Saint Mary's ! How great is our debt ! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well ; 

They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

ISTor fail of thy virtues to tell. 

The love that they feel is a heritage pure ; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 

Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of the past 
With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! to the last 
Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 
Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove, 
And carry thy teachings o'er woodland and hill 
Of earnestness, wisdom and love. 



~^> 






Eight 



Saint Mary's School 
The Board of Trustees 



The Bishops 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D.. Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Wm. Alexander Guerry, D.D Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Tnos. C. Darst, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Kirkman G. Finlay, D.D Columbia, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, D.D Charlotte, N. C. 



Clerical and Lay Trustees 



North Carolina 
(Until 1930) (Until 1927) 

Mr. Graham H. Andrews, Raleigh Rev. M. A. Barber, Raleigh 

Mr. Tnos. H. Battle, Rocky Mount Mrs. T. W. Biokett, Raleigh 

Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham 

Mrs. W. D. Toy, Chapel Hill Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, Henderson 



(Until 1930) 
Rev. J. B. Gibble, Wilmington 
Mr. Geo. C. Royall, Goldsboro 



East Carolina 

(Until 1927) 
Rev. R. B. Orane, D.D., Edenton 
Mr. W. D. MacMili.an, Jr., Wilmington 



(Until 192S) 
Rev. J. W. Cantey Johnson, Gastonia 
Mr. Geo. H. Holmes, Tryon 



Western North Carolina 

(Until 1927) 
Rev. John H. Griffith, Lenoir 
Mr. Addison C. Mangum, Gastonia 



(Until 1929) 
Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston 
Dr. Wm. Eoleston, Hartsville 



South Carolina 

(Until 1929) 
Rev. W. S. Poyneh, Florence 
Rev. Wm. Way, Charleston 



Upper South Carolina 
(Until 1927) (Until 1927) 

Mr. G. H. Green, Rock Hill Rev. Malcolm S. Taylor, Greenville 

Mr. W. S. Manning. Spartanburg Rev. T. T. Walsh, York 



Executive Committee 
Rt, Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman 
Mr. Graham H. Andrews Rev. Isaac W. Hughes 

Mrs. T. W. Bickett 

Mr. W. A. Erwin Mr. Geo. C. Royal 

Secretary of the Board of Trustees 

Mr. Al. Purrington, Raleigh, N. C. 

Treasurer of the Board of Trustees 
Mr. A. W. Tucker, Raleigh, N. C. 




WM 







Thk Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, D.D. 



V 



-<-* 




The Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Peniok 



. «?. ■., 









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The Rev. Warren Wade Way 
Sixth Rector of Saint Mary's School. IMS 



Eighteen 




Miss Catherine Aleertson 
Dean of Students, 1926 






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Miss Virginia Henry Holt 
Academic Head 



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Twenty 



ii 




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lEr 







Miss Kate McKimmon 

"Constant as the Northern Star, 
Of whose true, fix'd, and resting quality 
There is no fellow in the firmament." 



J 



Emilie McVea. 




Twenty-one 



: ■ 

lite 




The Faculty and Officers of Saint Mary's 
1926-1927 

Rev. Warren W. Way Rector 

Miss Catherine Seton Aebebstoh Dean of Students 

Miss Virginia Henry Hoi.t Academic Hear! 

A. W. Tucker Secretary and Business Manager 

The Academic Department 
Rev. Warren W. Way Bible 

A.B., Hobart College*; A.M., University of Chicago; Rector of Saint Mary's. 191a — 

Virginia Henry Holt English 

A.B., Smith College; A.M., University of Virginia 



William B. Stone.. 



.-History, Economics and Sociology 



A.B.. Harvard 

Hazel Harriet Riley' Science 

University of Vermont; Ph.B.. 1914. A.M., 1916 

Florence Gustafason Science 

A.B., Hunter College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 

Bertha Ruef French 

A.B., Vassal' College 



Lohaii Monroe.. 



..Mathematics 



A.B., Wellesly College 

Susan Reavis Cooke English 

Ph.B., University of Chicago 



LORA E. SlMBOLOTTI-. 



Spanish and French 



Berlitz School of Languages, Boston 



Mabel Julia Shapcott.. 



A.B., Colorado College; A.M., Columbia University 



Latin 



Caroline Hun ley Agee English and History 

A.B., Agnes Scott College; 11. A.. Columbia University 

Epitii Scott Roberts English and History 

A.E.. Vanderbilt University; A.M., George Peabody College for Teachers 



Mrs. Carolyn Clarke MacMui.len French 

„ ■ . 






..— 



, A.B., North Carolina College for "Women 



Grace Houchen Physical Education 

Harvard University Department of Physical Education, Peabody Oollege 



E. L. Hinkle French 

A.B., University of Colorado; M.A., Columbia 



Twenty-two 







I 



Twenty -three 



Music Department 

William H. Jones. A. A. G. 0., Director Piano, Organ, Voire, Theory 

A.U., Trinity College; Berlin, Germany 

Ely a B. Nicholson Piano 

Mount Allison Conservatory 

Sallie Charles Cheatham Piano 

li. .Mo-., Converse College 

Ethel Fielding Voice 

New England Conservatory of Mum 

Mrs. Bessie Rate McMillan Violin 

Gustave Hagedorn 

Art Department 
Gladys Milligan Drawing, Painting, Design 

Western College for Women; Westminster College; Fran Institute 

Expression Department 
Florence C. Davis, Director Expression, Dramatic Art 

B.O., Emerson College 

f, ' 
_ ~. -£5W=_-»u *>w^.,- .* r, ^-' 

Business Department 
Lizzie H. Lee Stenography, Typewriting, Bookkeeping 



Home Economics Department 



Elizabeth Bason Domestic Science, Domestic Art 

A.B., Flora HacDonald; Teachers College, Columbia University 



OFFICERS 1926-1927 

Rev. Warren W. Wat. 

Miss Catherine Ai.berstox 

Miss Virginia Henrt Holt 

Miss Kate McKimmon 

Mrs. Hugh McLeod 

Mrs. Nannie H. Marriott 

Miss Florence U. Talbot 

Miss Annie Alexander, R.N 

Graduate of St.. Vincent's Hospital, N 



'*t<*t 

Dr. A. W. Knox.. 



tti? 



Dr. H. B. Haywood, Jr.~. 

A. W. Ticker 

S.B.. Massachusetts Institute of Te 

Miss Juliet B. Sutton 

Miss Mart Lewis Sasser 

Miss Ella Howell Weedon 






Twenty-four 



.Latin 



University 



..English and History 



English anil History 

College for Teachers 

* French 



Physical Education 

li.ni. Peabody College 

French 




Twenty-five 



Our Faculty 















T^v EAN of Students, Albertson, 
^^^ Whom we all love each clay, 
And then the rector full of fun, 

Our dear friend, Mr. Way. 
And as our Knowledge Path we tread 

Comes one we'll love forever, 
Miss Holt, our Academic Head, 

Capable, sweet and clever. 
Mr. Stone is next in line, 

Whom any day j'ou'll see, 
Whether it be rain or shine 

With hikers full of glee. 
Red O.K.'s and purple ink 

Remind us of Miss Monroe; 
While often to the country links 

Davis and Roberts go. 
Our English teacher, Miss Agee, 

Loves themes to make us write, 
And oft the midnight oil burn we 

Studying Bible with our might. 
Miss Riley and her Science M 

Cause much distress and worry 
And clear across the campus, gym 

Puts one in quite a hurry, 
And here Miss Houchcn reigns o'er all 

In dancing, swimming, basketball. 
The rest are much the same as these. 

So hen 1 we'll end if you will please. 

FoX-Wll'KKliSlIAM. 



( 



V 






Twenty-six 




CLA55E5 




Twenty- seven 













Mr. W. E. Stone Miss Grace Hocchen 

Sponsor of the Senior Class, 1921 Class Adviser 

Senior Class 

Colors: Red and Gray Flower: Red Rose 

Motto: He who conquers, conquers himself 

Class Officers 

Fannie Aiken President 

Frances Brown Vice President 

Sallie Sattertiiwaite Secretary and Treasurer 

Mela Royall .' Historian 

Frances Brown Testator 

Genevieve Dando Prophet 

Reuekah Waiideli : Poet 

School Council Members 
Fannie Aiken Margaret Bdrckmyer 

Mela Royall Edna Faust Harris 

Laura Owens 

Class Roll 

Acton — ^^ Cauthen Lancaster Royall 

Aiken ' Cross Macdonald Satterthwaite 

Badham Dando Marriner Shelton, A. 

Barber Doar Mathis Shelton, E. 

Broadhurst Dortch Matthews Thigpen 

Brown Evans, A. Muse Thurman 

Burckmyer Evans, V. Owens Trotter 

Carlton Harris Read Waddell 

Cason Joyner Rodman Wolfe 



Twenty -eight 




If you see somebody smiling it is apt 
to be Alice. Of course every one is always _., 
complimenting her dancing but that is 
not all that is nice that could be_ said 
about her by a long shot! Lovable and 
sweet, Alice always has a ^vord, for 
everybody and is always willing to help 
out when she can. 




Vice President of the Georgia Club (1) ; Grand- 



daughters' Club (1, 2, 3); Altai- Guild (1, 2. 3); 
Clinpcl Librarian (2); Letter Club (2); Track 
Teaui\ (2) ; Viee^J?xesi_dent of the Junior Class 
(2) ; -Hcmor Committee (2>.3) ; Pan-Arebon Coun- 
cil ( 3 ); Secretary of SchooX Council (3); Sigma 
Lambda Sfarshal (3); President— of^the Senior 
Class (3).-; Cotillion CWb J3)- Tennis Team 
(1. 2, 3). 

Isn't it funny how srimeipeople can just 
do things? Well. Fannie 1 i's one of them. 
Knowing her capability we expect 
it of her. Although Fannie is a "woman 
of few words" she is very active with her 
actions, and does the right thing just 
at the right time. That is an art Chat 
all of us envy her for and for which 
we would be glad to swap our best virtue. 
Fannie, being conscientious, hardworking, 
sincere and a real girl is an ideal 
Saint Mary's student. " 
President! 



V* 



|SjvXJ^ 



J o. 



o 



Twenty-nine 



o 




Warden (21; Altar Guild (1. 2); College Club 
(1, 2); Tliird Team Basketball (1). 

"I'd give my last cent for 'Boots' 
Badham's head" — how often that has been 
said at Saint Mary's! "Boots" is lots 
of fun. Even if you are a grouchy old 
fellow and peculiar you can't help liking 
her. "Boots" enjoys a good time — that's 
certain — but she can get that fuzzy head 
in a book and she does do that thing, 
too. 



We have always heard that ministers 
do the correct thing — yet we can't help 
having a hard feeling toward Mr. Barber 
because he is always too prompt about 
getting Lib away from us. Anyway, she 
has found time to make us all think that 
she is a versatile, attractive girl. Lib 
has helped the long, boring hours in class 
to go quickly because o£ the amusing 
points of argument that she can think of, 
which make us wonder why that thought 
did not come to us first. 



N 







o 




Joyce Broadhurst 

Dublin, Ga. 
1924-1927 



E. A 




College Club (1, 2, 3)- President nf College 
Club (3); Swimming Team (*2) ; Church Librarian 
(3); E. A. P. Marshal (3); Georgia Club (1); 
President of Letter Club (3), 

Joyce is our sunshine, and even on 
rainy days and blue Tuesdays she makes 
us feel bright and happy. Will Joyce 
ever stop giggling? We hope not, lor 
it's such a happy sound to all of us who 
love her. She is far from being frivolous, 
we are sure of that — just modest, inV- 
nocent, merry-making— that's Joyce. We 
dozen more like her. 



wish we had 




Frances Scott Brown 

Oxford, N. C. 
1925-1927 



Assistant Editor of Stage Coach (l, 2); Dra- 
niatic Club (1, 2); Business Manager of Dramatic 
Club (2). Associate Editor of the Muse (2); 
Track Tram (2); College Club (1, 2); Vice Pres- 
klent-of Class (2); Last wil) and Testator (2). 

We kn\>w of no more sincere, depend- 
able and capable girl than Frances. 
She is one of the quietest and most pen- 
sive seniors on the Hall, but, like all 
still waters, she runs deep^ There is no 
doubt lier gentle manner, her affable 
disposition, her willingness to Serve has 
painted the name of Frances -Brown irrad- 
icably in iall of our hearts and she'll 
never be forgotten. 



ki 



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ft 



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Thirty- one 





College Club (1, 3); South Carolina Club (1). 
Business Manager of STAGE COACH (3); Honor 
Committee (3) ; Track Team (1, 2, 3) ; First Team 
Volley Ball (1, 2). Swimming Team (2); Tenuis 
Team (1, 2, 3); Altar Guild (2, 3); Cotillion 
Club (3); Supervisor of East Rock (3-); Assist- 
ant Chapel Warden (2) : Pan-Archon Council (3). 

"Peggy," you old heap of sunshine, 
with your cheerful and happy "hee-haw" 
and "hee-hee," yen. have won the love Of 
every girl at Saint Mary's and it's not 
throwing love away to give it to you 
either. In Peggy we have a dependable, 
delightful pal and- she's as pleasant as 
dessert on Friday nights. Because 
Peggy's temper is under a mass of red 
hair don't forget that it is also under 
control. Peggy has been a hard worker 
on the Stage Coach and she has helped 
a great deal to make it progress from its 
covered wagon days to, a beautiful, aristo- 
cratic Stage Coach. 

)rt).::-"J)*')-s 



Warden (3); Altar Guild (3); North Carolina 
Club (1); Second Team Volley Ball (1, 2); Cus- 
todian of banner (3) ; Supervisor (1). 

Margaret seems always "striving to 
please," and that's what she_-do.es. When 
we others are, complaining, grumbling, 
and everything's going dead wrong— take 
a look at Margaret and , follow that "I 
won't-be-disagreeable" way she has. She 
is an ever-present proof that one can be 
gay and yet not noisy. She goes quietly 
about her work. If the other thirty-five 
seniors were like her the proctors would 
be fired, and what a peaceful abode Sen 
Hall would be. 





m 



Thirty-two 



o 



□ 




Altar Guild (1 
(1, 2) ; Track <1) 



Granddaughters CDul) 
Chapel Librarian (2). 



We envy "Makey" for her style, her dis- 
position, and her way of getting along 
with people. There are always some girls 
whom we just naturally like to be around, 
and "Makey" is one of those to whom 
we always flock. If you dare borrow one 
of "Makey's" dresses, you feel proud in 
dressing up, for you know you have on 
quality and style. 



Elizabeth is among the intelligentsia 
of the Class of '27. When it comes tc 
sense we will place Cauthen against the 
best" of theni. How would Miss Shap- 
cott survive in the Latin M class without 
Elizabeth? Because she has been a day 
pupil, we have not seen as^ much of her 
as we should have likedV We have found 
that besides her ability to walk away 
with scholastic honors she is a ti'\ie 




O 



Tlrirty-three 



o 




Sigma 



Siei.la Louise Wolfe 

Kingstree, S. C. 

1923-1924 

1926-1927 

Sigma Lambda 




First Team Basketball (1, 2); Glee Club (1); 
Southern Club (1) ; Second Team Volley Ball (X) ; 
School Orchestra (2); Letter Club (2); ".Most 
Striking" (2). 

Three years ago Stella left her happy 
home and came to Saint Mary's. The 
next two years she pursued her education 
in South Carolina. In 1926 Stella realized 
that there was no place like Saint Mary's 
and she came to take a diploma home - 
with her. We are all so happy that Stell 
did come back and proud of the most 
striking looking girl at Saint Mary's and 
one possessing so striking a personality. 
Foil should experience those wild thrills of 
joy 'when Stella plays the piano in the 
parlor and you should see the Mus 
frown when they see Stella with the 
basketball, for it means a victory for the 
Sigmas. 

: Jril : • vi * >> 



Collese Club (1); North Carolina Club (1); 
Glee Club (2); Dramatic Club (1. 2. 3); Altar 
Gtiild (2, 3); Chapel Librarian (2); Chairman 
Altar Guild Committee (3); Crucifer (3); Latin 
Club— (3) ; Expression Certificate (3). 

Here's to Mary Hunter, . just the girl 
who will make good at anything! Mary 
Hunter has real dramatic ability which 
has helped to make every play a success 
since she first came to Saint Mary's. We 
are afraid to think of a dramatic club 
without her. She is serious, but never 
too long at a time, for that dignity is 
bound to give way to the overpowering 
fun that is in Mary. She also has the 
looks which should have been divided 
among some of the rest of us. Mary is 
generous enough to divide this beauty, 
too, if it were possible. That is just her 
character. 



N 



4 

-i4 




D 



JD 




Sketch Club (1, 2. 3) : College Club (1, 2, 3); 
Secretary and Treasurer of Sophomore Class (2); 
Secretary and Treasurer Northern Club (1); Vice 
President Sketch Club (l); "Most Attractive' 
(3) ; Class Prophet (3). 

Dando is a bundle of good natural 
humor and accommodation paralleled only 
by her jolly disposition. You aren't sur- 
prised when you laugh at what she says; 
you are rather surprised if you don't 
laugh. "Eat, drink and be merry" is a 
motto of daily application in Dando's 
life. 



College Club (1, 2) : Dramatic Club (1, 2); 
South Carolina Club (1, 2) ; Swimming Team 
(1); Track Team (1); Altar Guild *<1, 2); Pro- 
gram Committee of— Sigma Lambdas (2) ; Decorat- 
ing Committee for the Chapel (2). 

Helen is a good sport,, care-free as a 
bird, excitable, but always capable in the 
intellectual world of making a good rec- 
ord for her class. Helen's vigo_r and 
keen, discriminating qualities, and 
simply "won't-come-off" smile have 



her scores of 



her 
won 




1 ■■:■ 




ifS 




Literary Editor of the Muse (1); Editor of the 
Muse (2) ; Dramatic Club (2) ; College Club 
(1, 2); Altar Guild (1, 2); Pan-Archon Counc" 
(2); Granddaughters Club (1, 2). 

Helen may be slow in saying what she 
has to say, but you may be sure she is 
saying something worth while. After a 
question has been asked Helen it never 
has to be passed on, for she tells every 
thing about the subject and the others 
in the class wonder how just one head^ 
holds all she knows. "We are proud of 
Helen for she's a capable girl. Editing 
the Bulletin has been her job and she 
has done creditable work to make it a 
: Ufcess. 



Annie Louise has been with Saint 
Mary's so long she has become a tradition. 
She is quiet and unassuming but after 
you know her you can feel her genuine- 
ness. Her ambition is a musical career, 
and we hope we shall hear of her success 
in this line. 





Thirty-six 



O 



a 







Secretary Virginia Club (1); Second Team 
Basketball (1, 2); Captain (2); First Team Vollev 
Ball (1. 2); Manager of Vollev Ball (2). Tennis 
(1, 2, 3); Track (1, 2, 3); Altar Guild (2, :i 1 ; 
Secretary and Treasurer Freshman Class (1); 
Choir (1. 2, 3); Glee Club (2, 3); College Club 
(1. 2, 3); Honor Girl (2): President .Junior 
Class (2)- School Council (2); Pan-Archon Coun- 
cil (2) ; Letter Club (S). 

Excellent in scholarship, faithful in 
duty, reserved in disposition, unaffected 
and kind in manner, this bespeaks Vir- 
ginia to a "T." Though she is filled with 
enthusiasm we never have got her on a 
"high horse" and that's why we maintain 
she'll always be level-headed in the great- 
eat crisis. From the smallest task tp: 
the largest deed Virginia puts hear 
soul in all she undertakes. 



President of Sigma Lambda Literary Society 
~(2),; Altar Guild (1, 2); College Club (3): 
Church Warden (2J. ; Council Member (2); Pan- 
Aicbon Council (2) 

"Faustie" made her fame -her first year 
at Saint Mary's. The 'Sigma Lambdas 
have trailed behind/ her^ajid hailed her 
as a great president. "Here* is a Vlear^ 
thinker, a deep thinker — in fact her 
"thinker" is one we would each like to 
have for our own. "Faustie," possessing 
a desire to do good, to amount to some- 
thing, and being always willing, to 'fender 
a service, is bound to come out on top. 



St« 



! xjm 




D 



o 




Sigma 



Frances Louise Joyner 

Louisburg, N. C. 

1926-1927 

Sigma Lambda 



Altar Guild (1); Glee Club (1); College Club 
(1); "Best Student" (1); Granddaughters Club 
(1). 

A girl who came in September to join 
the Class of '27 was Louise. After the 
first month we realized that she was not 
one of the just-passing seniors working 
for a diploma. When she received then 
three A's we put- her up on a pedestal 
and gazed and wondered at her. Louise 
-is one of the most helpful girls we have 
in the class. She has knowledge and she 
is willing to let others light their candles 
by it. Shehas also found time to make 
friends and keep them. 



Sali.ie Maude Lancaster 
Vanceboro. N. C. 
1924-1927 
.1/" E. 



Altar Guild (1, 2, 3) : Brass Committee (3); 
Glee Club 12 1; North Carolina Club (11; College 

Club 12, 3). 

"Sy-moid"!! She has mastered that 
"D" math — or Math "D" it is. You will 
admit she is a persevering lass, always 
ready to help any one at any time. Her 
cheerful "yes. I'll do it" has never failed 
any of us, even when the chairman of the 
brass committee asks for volunteers. 





Thirty-eight 



D 



JCJ 




Dramatic Club (1, 2); College Club (2); Pres- 
ident of E. A. P. Literary, Society (2) ■ Pan- 
Arcbon Council (2); Latin Club (2). 

"Snookie" is a veritable standby of the 
E. A. P.'s. Without her — oh, well we 
just don't think of it in that respect, 

"Snookie" is little in stature, but that 
is the only time "little" can be used to 
describe her. It takes grit like 
"Snookie's" to get by in the world — 
yet, just to "get by" is not her policy. 
"Snookie" will run the second mile and 
you may count on her to win. 




Assistant Editor Stage Coach (1); Altar Guild 
(1. 2); Editor-in-Chief of Stage Coach (2); 
PonArclion Council (2)- Church Warden (2); 
"Must, Capable" [SXi.. College Club ( 1, 2); Com- 
mencement UsbcT (1). 

Here is the future business woman of 
our class; efficient, steady and depend- 
able exactly describes Frances. Whether 
she is working for the 'Stack Coach or 
proctorlhg, you may pB'sure VhaFTt/ts 
going to be done thoroughly and well. 
Furthermore our great confidence in her 
ability is shown in lier grades. Good luck 
to you, Marriner! We arc wishing that 
you will always go steadily ahead as you 
do today. Is there anything else) you 
, want to know about Marriner? If soi con- 
sult this annual, she was Editor-in-Chief. 



A4 



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Bl 



CD 




Glee Club (1): College Club (1). 

Lib, we thank you for helping Saint 
Mary's by coming here and being a Senior. 
The first day after our arrival we met 
you, the second day, we liked you, and 
the third day we were all in love with 
our new Senior. You have held that love, 
and the day you leave Saint Mary's we 
won't tell you good-bye — that's too sad — J 
we'll say, "We'll be seeing you!" — just to" 
encourage us, you know. 



College Club (1, 2); Granddauebters Club 

(1 4 2). 

"Poncy— Ponc-y4" -£an be heard any 
morning about seven-fifteen. Tis only 
Edy the Barker paying the early morning 
call. Then the discussion of "what can 
we eat that isn't fattening?." Florence's 
chief ambition is to get thin. "Why worry 
so? We love you and will alway§^-r^"^' v \ 
member the hospitable, sweet little friend 
who hails from Rocky Mount- 




□ I 



o 




Dramatic Club (1, 2, 3)- President of Drama- 
tic Club (3); College Club (2); Nortb Carolina 
Club (1); Literary Editor of Stage Coach (3) f 
Inter-Society Debater (2)- Business Managevof 
Cotillion Club (3); Treasurer of E. A. P. Literary 
Society (3) ; Winner of second plate in Expression 
Recital (1) ; Expression Certificate A3) ; ..Paii- 
Archon Council (3); "Wittiest" "T'i)_; "Most Origi- 
nal" {3); "Most Magnetic Personality" (3); 'M"s| 
Popular" (2, 3). f 

"Che-e-er-up!" Jonnie's pet exclama- 
tion is just a microscopic sample of h.er£ 
perpetual cheering. Just show us the 
drudge whom Jonfiie cannot hurl Into 
hilarity. U hurts (bitters! I to think how 
our class "would have existed with no 
Jonnie to come to our rescue just when- 
ever anything was needed. Her dramatic 
ability is our pride and joy-^but wily try 
to elaborate ou her qualities for any one 
who knows Jonnie knows what a sincere, 
delightful personality she has. 






Altar Guild (1, 2); College Club (1, 2); Vice 
President of the College Club (2)- Glee Club 
(1);" Track Team (1, 2); Second Team Basket- 
ball (1): Second Team Volley Ball (1); Manager 
f Tennis (2). Student Council Member_ (3) ; 



Delegate to Camp Penick 
Club M.'-StT -first Tean 



fc'irsl 



J.v 



Dramatic .Cliib (2) 
(1) ; Gnniddauglitei 
Basketball (2). 

To begin with this young lady, we will 
say that -we should all he- proud to have 
those eyes. Laura is always ready to lend 
a helping hand and to accommodate you 
even when she is busy herself. She has 
just the amount of pep to put anything 
over. When the Mus start counting up 
their stars, "Lolly" is the tirst mentioned. 

Here is a girl who leaves behind her 
friends, and friends at Saint Mary's, and 
such a girl as "Lolly" will keep on malt- 
ing friends forever 




m 



□ 




Brass Committee (4); Altar Guild (3, 4)- Col- 
lege Clulj (3, 4); Supervisor Senior Hall (4); 
Second Team Volley Ball (1); Track Team (1, 2X" 

Mary Read after three years a,t-Saint 
Mary's decided to take a trip abroad so 
that she might come back and inform the 
class of '27 "how, when and what to do." 
if they ever should be lucky enough to go. 
This shows her thoughtful and accomodat- 
ing nature, for most Saint Mary's girls 
go only after they graduate. Mary hasv 
remained faithful to us all throughout the 
past four years, and the older 
pecially will miss hei 



"Come on, let's go dance in the parlor!" 
Yes, that Olzie, but although tripping the 
light fantastic holds strong appeal for her, 
Olzie is not without her serious side as 
well. "I'm going to graduate!" has been 
her cry, and forthwith she has become a 
veritable storehouse of facts, gleaned 
from diligent study. Olzie can state 
her opinion on anything from capital 
punishment to fried potatoes with equal 
conviction and with it all we have found 
true and generous friend. 





^■••..Mjf 






A 



Forty! vvo 



D 



v.._ 



o 







- 



Winner of Niles Medal (1)- Second Team 
Basketball (I. 2); Track Team (1, 2, 4); Man- 
ager of Basketball (2) ; First Team Volley Ball 
(2, 3); Delegate to Blue Ridge (2)- North Caro- 
lina Club (1, 2); Tennis Team (2, 3); President 
Mus (3); Pan-Archon Coun.il (3, 4)- First Team 
Basketball (3, 4); Altar Guild (3,' 4); Sigma 
Lambda Debater (3); Marshal (31- Letter Girl 
(3); Letter Club (4); College Club (4); Hon.ni- 
Committeo (2, 3, 4): President Student Body (4); 
Chairman Honor Committee (4); Secretary 
Student Council (4); Class Historian (4); "BesL/ 
All round" (3, f) . 

It would be easier to try and tell the 
things our "Pride and Joy" cannot do. 
They would be so few anyway. Mela, you 
have led us; we have followed. Is there 
any one else that we could have kept so 
closely behind? Mela, we love you; we 
respect you; we send our good wishes 
with you. When you leave Saint Mary's, 
you leave a record, a wonderful one. The 
Class of. '27 is proud of you, for we feel 
that you are ours. Here's to our "Best 
All-round Girl" — to you, Mela. 



Altai- Guild (1, 2, 3); North Carolina Club 
(1): Volley Ball Sub. (2); Commencement Mar- 
shal (3): Blue Ridge Delegate (3); Choir (3, 4); 
Supervisor of Bast Wing (3) ; President Altar 
Guild (4); Pan Archon Council (4)- Secretary 
and Treasurer of Senior Class (4). 

Sallie is just everything a fine, girl 
should be. She is one ot, our most con- 
scientious members, yet far from being a 
"sissy." We wonder just what would 
have become of the little Chapel this 
year if Sallie had not been here. We also 
want to thank Sallie for her frankness 
in class when as our spokesman she 
has said the right thing to advance the 
argument. We have marveled then and 
hated our shyness. Whenever we think of 
this class of '27. Sallie will always pop 
into our minds. Good luck to you, Sallie 
—you deserve it. 



v~ 



4 

Li 



:mJ 



::.-% 



O 




College Club (2); Altar Guild (1, 2); Glee 
Club (1); Chairman Brass Committee of Altar_ 
Guild (2)- Second Team Volley Ball (1); Thli-H 
Team Basketball (1, 2); Track Team (2). y 

When we see two stately and brave 
State boys walking un_ oiujbe 'campus — 
oh, how we envy the "Shelton sisters" 
for there come the "Brothers"; and some- 
times on a nicer- sunny day the Brothers 
are accompanied by their "boy friends.- : 
Some girls afe just born lucky! You may- 
rest assured that Annie Parker will not 
give Saint Mary's- "Headquarters" any 
trouble. She's just a valuable friend as. 
every one will testify 



Altar Guild (1, 2); Vice President of Altar 
'-"6uild (2); College Club (2); Glee Club (1, 2); 
CliolXU. 2); Th ird T eam Basketball (1); Brass 
Committee of AJrar~~Girrki^ (2). 

It is hard to realize that Speed is large 
enough to hold Ethel in it, for she's so 
full of pep and fun. so_ full of joy and 
giggles that we believe it would take 
more than the curfew law to bring her in. 
\Ve believe- (as none of us have happened 
around at such a time") that Annie Parker 
arid Ethel have roomed together two 
years and never quarreled — yea, they are 



>s 








O 



Forty-four 



o 




Altar Guild (!)■ North Carolina Club (1) ; 
College Club (1, 2, 3); Basketball Team (1, 2); 
Secretary and Treasurer Junior Class (2) ; Treas- 
urer of Sigma Lambda Literary Society (2/) ; 
Secretary of Sigma Lambda Literary Society ^3 ) ■ 
Mu Cheer Leader (2, 3) ; Tennis Team "fi 2) ; 
Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Chief Marshal (,2f. 

"Thig" has a mighty sweitStfttle vo>fee 
in that mighty sweet little self of neks. 
Even though sheJs little she has neveY 
been tramped on, for she can squeal ilk 
time and you're always glad to see her> 
If you are in a- bad humor she's a sure 
remedy for that; if you're happy you 
leave her happier. She's just good medi- 
cine. Mr. Stone should never mix . 
"Ting's" name and call her "Pig Pen," 
for- she's a neat little child and always 
gives the impression of having just step- 
,., ped put.of the. hand box. i 

^MwwtjW 



Cotillion Club (2); College Club (2)- L-tter 
-Club (2); Secretary and Treasurer of the' Sigmas 
(27^ Second Team Basketball (1); First Team 
Basketball (2) : Jlanagec of Sigma Basketball (2) ; 
First "Team Volley Ball (1); Tennis Champion 
(1) ; Swimming Team (1) ; tlass Poet (2). 

If she says she will/shel will, ano\if she 
says she won't she WQij^^d youynay 
depend on that. Mary has three distinct 
aims in the life at Saint Mary's— To work 
lor the Sigmas, make good grades anB 
have a good time. All three /oL these 
come natural for Mary. The Mils dread 
her; she holds her books only for a little 
while and knows more than most of us 
who have studied them all day. Mary 
has a most "wonderful sen.<je of humor. 
Tell your little trifling joke to her and 
she will enjoy it when others never, 
would have guessed the i>&fnt. ( That's 
just. Mary's sharpness. 



Ol 



Forty-fire 



JCD 




/ 



North Carolina Club (1); Dramatic Club (2, 3). 
College Club (1, 2); Cotillion Club (3). 

Never has it been said more sincerely 
and appropriately "to know her is to love 
her." Jennie is a real, honest-to-goodness 
girl, one who is ready to-be your friend 
at the time you need one most. She's 
lots of fun and has besides plenty of 
good common sense. Capable, depend- 
able, true as steel — what else need be 
said about Jen? 







Vice President Sigma Lambda Literary Society 
(2); Choir (1, 2): Glee Club (2) : Track Team 
(1, 2) ; Volley Ball (1) ; Chairman of Program 
Committee Sigma Lambdas (2); College Club (2). 

Have you ever been to Senior Hall near 
the end of a month or near exams, and 
failed to find its occupants wearing 
lengtby faces? Well, have you ever failed 
to find at least one suuijy face among 
them? No. Becky is the class champion 
when it comes to care-free ways. She 
interrupts one when hastily scribbling 
Bible notes, cramming "Eccy," writing 
English N— or at any other old time with 
a burst of song — "Let's go to the little 
store!" In spite of it all she seems to 
always come out on top. 

"ST 4 

Mb 






U: 




ft*. 



D 



Forty -six 



Class Poem 

There's a sadness that pulls at the heart strings, 
There's a gladness that fills all the soul, 

With the sorrow that comes at our parting- 
Is a joy in reaching the goal. 

How the hours have flown since we came here ! 

Though we counted them each with a sigh, 
Their echoes now vibrantly ringing 

Can never grow fainter or die. 

As we go forth to form the next stanza 

Of our life poem now just begun, 
We'll find inspiration and courage 

In this first battle hard fought but won ! 

Farewell then, our dear Alma Mater ! 

Farewell honored school of our youth ! 
Your name will bring back to us always 

The thought of thy love, strength and truth. 

Rebekah Waddell. 




Class History 









V 



1 a.m. 
November 19, 1932. 

Dearest Virginia: I just got back from the theater and I simply cannot resist telling 
you right away about what I saw. 

The entertainment was called "L* histoire de la Classe de 1927," by Helen Dortch! 
Isn't it thrilling that our class has inspired an authoress to write a play? But let me 
tell you all about it. 

You see, each act represented a year in our class's school life. Of course, just incidents 
characteristic of famous episodes in the Class's history were interwoven in the plot. 

The first scene showed fifty-four awkward, bewildered Freshmen arriving at school, 
being met by Miss Morgan, welcomed by Mr. Way, matriculating under Miss Turner's 
supervision, and being miserably homesick all the time! The rest of the scene of 
this act recalled happier memories — the election of "Scottie" as class president and Miss 
Force as adviser; getting into a scrape by dessing "tacky" for Chapel; going home 
for Christmas and Spring holidays; watching with round eyes the awesome event of 
graduation; singing lustily to the Seniors. 

In Act 2, a distinct advance in character development was noticed. (Ahem! — 
doesn't the above sentence remind you of English N?) No longer did the actresses 
register "greenness"; instead, "savoir-faire" might better characterize their attitude. 
Oh, the joy of being an old girl! Quite enthusiastically Louise Allen was elected class 
president and Miss Houchen adviser; under the leadership of these two, the Sophomores 
passed a happy year — a year in which such events as the Halloween party, Colonial ball 
and Class parties were thoroughly enjoyed. This act closed with the class song to the 
Seniors. 

Intermission 

I thought the third act would never begin! Of course I could hardly wait to see us 
as Juniors. The first scene gave the most characteristic impression of the Juniors. 
We were giving a tea to make money for the Junior-Senior banquet! "Thig" as treasurer, 
and you, Virginia, as president, were represented as beaming joyfully over the healthy 
condition of the money box. 

Next we were shown enjoying our privilege of going down town unchaperoned, studying 
in our room, and finally, strutting off to the Banquet — luxuriously dining in the "Sir 
Walter" "ballroom. The last scene held a note of sadness. We took part in the step 
singing and serenade for the first time. We registered a half-proud, half-sad attitude at 
the thought of taking the Seniors' places. Then came the making of the daisy chain 
for the out-going class. And our farewell song — 

"Remember 
Though we drift apart in years to come 

Our thoughts will return to this our home, 
St. Mary's, then we'll remember." 

For the last act, Act 4, the curtain went up slowly, Seniors! There we all were — 
Fannie Aiken as president, Mr. Stone, our sponsor. Miss Houchen our adviser — and the 
class — 'thirty-seven of us. We lived in Senior Hall and the Rock; we chaperoned; we sat 
in the back of the Chapel; we gave the Christmas play. "The Perfect Gift." and the 
Christmas tree; we sang carols; we felt "big." 

Then the last half of the year came bringing with it the Banquet, with us the 
honored guests; it brought Easter and the realization that this was our last Easter at 
Saint Mary's; Exams came — we passed them. Then capped and gowned we sallied forth 
to the school party; and suddenly Class Day was upon us, with its symbol — the daisy 
chain and its song: "Goodbye School, We're Through." Last but not least was the final 
graduation scene. In the Chapel, we received our diplomas from Bishop Cheshire. Then, 
misty-eyed, we marched forth as the choir sang "Jerusalem. High Tower." From the 
Chapel we threaded our way to the front of Smedes Hall, and there amid a breathless 
hush heard these momentous words spoken: 

"The S5th session of Saint Mary's School is now closed. School is dismissed!" 

Will you ever forget it all — the joy and the sadness! 

Well, good-night, fellow alumna! 

Heaps of love, Mela. 



Forty-eight 



Class Prophecy 



TWENTY years have elapsed since I bid my classmates "good-bye," and left them at 
Saint Mary's. It seems as though it were yesterday that we parted, each one to 
go out into the world lor herself — with the aim of making it better because we had 
lived in it. 

Yearning to see some of my classmates again and to gain some knowledge of my 
friends I decided to lease my studio and leave my painting awhile. With my meager 
funds, I bought a mosquito aeroplane and started out on my journey. 

I had hardly left Brooklyn when I heard the terrible roar of a high-powered plane 
above me. As I kept mounting* I noticed that it was a taxi-plane, piloted by no other 
than Olzie Rodman. She had gone to New York to "try out" for the stage. The high 
cost of living proved too much for her, and doing this was much more thrilling — the 
salary was quite attractive, too. Olzie told me that she piloted home in three hours 
(her plane traveled 200 miles an hour) the last week-end and found many of the girls 
were still in North Carolina. 

Ethel Shelton, although happily married, but preferring woman's rights, was con- 
ducting a campaign for her widowed sister, A. P. Shelton, who was running for mayor 
of Speed, and they had chartered Olzie's plane to distribute their pamphlets, as Speed 
had grown so large it took quite a time to cover it. 

Elizabeth Barber had become a prominent lawyer — her arguments were being spread 
far and wide, causing men lawyers to feel their insignificance. If Mr. Stone could only 
hear her now! ! ! 

I was also very glad to hear from my friend that Virginia Evans had become a 
Grand Opera singer and had refused many suitors to pursue her career which had 
proved a most brilliant one. 

Louise Joyner was Dean of Students, but Olzie said that Mr. Way was thinking of 
ridding the school of her as she had acquired too much spirit of the age. She wanted 
each girl to have her own aeroplane at school and to cut down the lovely "grove of 
stately oak trees" for landing places. 

Our parking limit, on one of the skyscrapers, was up, so Olzie and I had to take leave 
of each other. But the news was delightful. 

Having some affairs in New York, I decided I had better land before the airway 
became too congested. As I drew near the landing place, I was blinded by countless 
lights. Hurrying down to the street to read the sign I was astounded to see "Trotter- 
Muse Co.," here tonight. They had joined Keith's!! I gave up my plans for the night 
immediately, to see them. When the curtain went up, I had expected to see two women, 
but instead I saw two, seemingly girls, although their hair was of a different hue I 
recognized their features. They were a great success, their youth was very well preserved 
as well as their jovial dispositions. I afterward read they had signed a contract to play 
on Broadway for three years. 

As I ascended to my mooring I noticed a bill-board stating that a coming attraction 
was "Hamlet" starring the "Genevieve Hamper" of modern drama— Mary Hunter Cross. 
Would not Miss Davis be consoled to know of the success of one of her pupils? I walked 
back down to glance at the bill-board and most of all to look at that old familiar face 
once more. 

I had hardly gone two steps from the theatre, when I met Mary Read — or I should 
say, President Mary Read — not changed in appearance but in position and intellect. 
She had lately been chosen President of Bryn Mawr, the youngest president to hold 
the chair, so I was greatlv honored to shake the band of this distinguished ex-classmate. 



She told me that Sallie Lancaster became interested in Missions and' after hearing for 



many years of the wonders of Anvik, had given her life to the worthy cause. 

As I came next into Richmond, I was amazed to see how it had grown, since I last saw 
it, while riding through on a train. Trains! the very idea of us riding on those slow 
motion things. They were fast passing into fancy and legend. 



, 









1™ 



I decided to land, as I had heard Annie Louise Evans had married a young clergyman 
and was living there. I found her quite easily, as I landed on the outskirts of the 
parish house grounds. She had matured into a beautiful matron and had several at- 
tractive children. I learned from her that Elizabeth Cauthen had spurned many a 
suitor and was now a nun in a convent in Europe. 

She also said that Alice Acton was taking Paris by storm, with her interpretative 
dancing, far surpassing Irene Castle and other great dancers of my day. 

I proceeded on to Georgia as Raleigh had prohibited mosquito aeroplanes landing 
within the city limits. 

I had hardly arrived in Georgia, when I saw several real estate billboards, announcing 
a St. Simon's Estate for sale, it being the estate of Mrs. James Sinkler. I immediately 
inquired as to who this woman was. I found out that she was the daughter of the 
former Mr. Frank Aiken. It was Fannie! Our class president was still reigning and 
owned a great deal of property — but that pest — namely the rat, had taken possession 
of the island, so she was selling her estate and sojourning in Algiers for a while as 
her husband was frail and had need of such a climate. 

I here learned that Joyce Broadhurst had for many years disputed between two 
gallant gentlemen and a single life — deciding finally to choose the single life. She was 
living in Athens, Georgia, and entertaining nightly for either the University boys or the 
Lucy Cobb girls. 

Fannie told me that Frances Marriner, being so talented in journalism had become 
editor of the "Illustrated New Bern News" and was living in perfect bliss. She was 
receiving all kinds of mail from boards and editors begging her to come to them but she 
was very staunch and true to North Carolina and would not be lured by lucre. 

Alice Cason was now Mrs. Walter Napier, and one of the leading social leaders of the 
South, as well as a perfect hostess. Fannie said she was doing her duty by getting the 
present St. Mary's girls out every week-end. 

While in Atlanta I came upon Margaret Carlton and her husband, a love that was 
not known to me during our schooldays. They were just going to see about getting their 
boys an aeroplane to take back to college. From Margaret, I learned that "Boots" 
Badham had just retired from the movies after a brilliant career — bringing as her 
reward John Burke, also a noted screen star, who had played as her leading man for 
quite a while. 

At the same time I learned that Laura Owens was a figure head in the Metropolitan 
Opera Company. She had been discovered by Marion Talley, while listening to her chant 
prayers in church. She had made triumphal tours all through Europe and was greeted 
everywhere with great enthusiasm. 

I had hardly left Georgia when I was forced down by a mechanical mishap. However 
I was glad it happened as it did, for at the repair station, I met Helen Doar, Stella 
Wolfe, "Snooks" Macdonald and Lib Mathis. They had brought Woolworth's chain of five 
and ten cents stores, and from their vast earnings were traveling de luxe all over the 
country. They were now going to Cuba and they were quite indignant with Helen Doar 
as she had made them break their non-stop flight to Cuba, by having to give her husband 
a few instructions about keeping the home straight and such domestic duties as he had 
to perform in his wife's absence. 

Stella Wolfe told me that Peggy Burckmyer had outdone Lord Byron, by swimming 
the Hellespont. I was very glad to hear this as it gave a great deal of credit to our 
old pool at St. Mary's, where as a girl Peggy had trained faithfully. Frances Brown 
had established a Saint Mary's abroad. She had left her charges and gone a great dis- 
tance, especially to see her ex-classmate perform this miraculous feat. This foursome 
also told me to stop in Washington to see Helen Dortch. I told them I would do so and 
with one more farewell took my leave. 

I came upon Dr. Dortch in her office, still as enthusiastic about life as ever, and still 
experimenting each day on the cure for heart trouble which had in its first stage done 
untold wonders for those afflicted with this disease. 

Just as I was departing a rather small person with three squawking children came into 
Dr. Dortch's office. All I remember is that I heard the weary mother say to one; 
"Murray, I am going to spank you hard when we get home if you do not behave." 



Fifty 



With one bound I was back in the office, with nothing but arms waving about me, 
and embracing my old roommate, the former Martha Thigpen. She had married a 
congressman from North Carolina and was now residing in Washington, D. C. I stayed 
in the city three weeks — mostly reminiscing— and also enjoying the tenderness and 
beautiful atmosphere that this household created. I broke- away with great difficulty 
and on the last day of the third week — climbed into my "mosquito" and piloted away. 

1 was mounting higher every minute when I came upon a dining plane just emerging 
from behind a cloud. Feeling that the pangs of hunger were upon me, I blew my horn 
and hailed the plane. When I beheld the clever little tea shop and most of all when 
I saw Mary Thurman seated at the cash register, I completely forgot my hunger. She 
had a quite artistic shop and the leverest parachutes to drop 1 food to the travelers 
that did not have time to land. 

While coasting along side by side, Mary told me that Mela Royall had taken Miss 
Houchen's place, (in fact she had been filling this position for some time) and she 
had gained great notoriety lately as she was the first "gym" teacher to introduce the 
Florence Matthews' reducing record — a great improvement over the Wallace records and 
also much more suitable. I also learned from her, that Sallie Satterthwaite had gained 
such great knowledge from our college Economics that she had independently started a 
factory, manufacturing aeroplane propellers, and was worth quite a fortune. 

These few pleasant moments were soon over and my thoughts were now turning 
toward my own pursuits, which had been sadly neglected within the last year. 

Upon returning to my studio I found a book awaiting me. I was overjoyed when I 
found that it was a new work of the famous duo, Waddell and Harris, on "The 
Psychological Study of a St. Mary's Girl of Twenty Years Ago." They had published 
other books on current events that were greatly valued by critics. 

Although I have been back at my studio for a month, I am still lost in the fond 
memories of my tour and of days of long ago, when we were all sweet girl graduates at 
Saint Mary's! 

Genevieve K. Dando, Prophet. 






Fifty-one 



Last Will and Testament of Class of 1927 









WE, the Senior Class of Saint Mary's School in the city of Raleigh, the county of 
Wake, and the State of North Carolina, having plumed our wings for flight, 
relative to our departure from this favored clime, do realize the certainty of examinations 
and the dreadful uncertainty which accompanies all such ordeals. Fearing that our 
present sanity may be conspicuously disturbed by said ordeal, we do deliberately set 
forth this document, bestowing our valued possessions, both material and intellectual, 
on those, some of whose faces we shall soon see for the last time, but whose memories 
we shall long cherish. 

Article 1. I, Fannie Aiken, do will and bequeath to the future Senior President my 
unparalleled ability to hold peaceful and orderly meetings in Senior Hall, hoping that she 
may emerge from similar meetings with as much sobriety as has been my custom. 

Art. 2. I, Mela Royall, am equally as proud of my soothing influence in our memor- 
able student body meetings, and I do will this undoubted ability to the next student 
body president. Advice as to maintaining discipline, I could give, but this would 
be useless without the effective aid which can best be obtained from a rolling pin 
factory. 

Art. 3. We, Rebekah Waddell and Laura Owens, do leave the Ouija board, owned by 
our roommate, Martha Jones, to any person who is desirous of attracting a mob to her 
room and who feels it necessary to peer into the perils of her future. 

Art. 4. I, Virginia Evans, do hopefully bequeath to any fortunate successor my habit 
of maintaining a musical atmosphere in Senior Hall at all or any hours. 

Art. 5. I, Peggy Burckmyer, do joyfully bequeath my notable "line" for extracting 
ads for the Stage Coach to whoever allows herself to be imposed upon next year. 
Never take "No" for an answer though they have that indomitable glare. 

Art. 6. We, Edna Faust Harris and Helen Badham, do recommend to next year's oc- 
cupants our room for its excellent situation, especially when Mr. Tucker sees fit to tune 
in on the radio. 

Art. 7. We, as a class, do hereby leave to Josephine Battle our sage advice to sit on the 
front seat in Bible N and win A's by giving vent to her bursts of merriment at appro- 
priate moments. 

Art. S. I, Elizabeth Barber, do reluctantly will to Ree Garrett my readiness at all 
times to start an argument and to maintain my point of view throughout Mr. Stone's 
classes. 

Art. 9. I, Louise Joyner, do will to Polly Parrott my renowned volubility. 

Art. 10. We, Jennie Trotter and Jonnie Muse (the Damon and Pythias of the class), 
do will to Elizabeth Smith and Elizabeth Hoggard our unexcelled genius for delighting 
the several members of the faculty in East Rock with the advice that they acquire a 
perpetually grinding victrola. 

Art. 11. I, Frances Marriner, do will my indefatigable energy to next year's editor 
of the Stage Coach. This energy will be found useful in keeping her many appoint- 
ments down town and in inveigling others to go down and have their pictures taken. 



" 



Fifty-two 



Art. 12. I, Sallie Satterthwaite, do bequeath to Helen Andrus my unprecedented use 
of the E. A. P. presidential robes and my red-haired flapper doll. May she never have a 
qualm in enacting my epoch-making deed. 

Art. 13. I, Helen Badham, do leave my patented curling irons to Phoebe Harding 
with the hopes that she will be as successful with them as I have been. 

Aim. 14. I, Laura Macdonald, do unhesitatingly bequeath my victrola to the occupants 
of lower Senior Hall of next year, with the wish that they reinstate it to its former 
glory. 

Art. 15. I, Florence Matthews, do leave to Elizabeth Reitzel my successful but secret 
recipe for reducing. 

Art. 16. I, Mary Hunter Cross, do leave my declamatory ability, renowned from 
class room and stage to the far corners of Senior Hall, to Katherine Duff. Take my advice 
Kack, and do not endanger yourself by practicing in Senior Hall! 

Art. 17. I, Jennie Trotter, do solemnly will to Sarah Falkner my scholarly diligence 
and resolution, in the waning hope that she may absorb enough to make a name in the 
annals of St. Mary's. 

Art. 18. I, Olzie Rodman, do will my mouse-like silence in chapel to Julia Pugh, in 
hopes that she may learn to follow my golden example and look never to the rear. 
Remember, Julia, this applies on Sunday afternoons! 

Art. 19. I, Edna Faust Harris, do will and bequeath to the class of '2S my prize 
possession, the apple of my eye, over which I have wrung my hands and labored — my Bible 
notebook! I say with Pharisee-like pride, it excels all other donations in value, volume 
and veracity. 

Art. 20. I, Genevieve Dando, do unselfishly will to Sarah Evins my unsurpassed rec- 
ord of promptitude. I feel that, of my bountiful merits, others can be left profitably to 
those less blest than I. With this noble thought in mind I bequeath to Rosa King 
Metcalf my unexcelled leadership in gym. I lead where no one follows. 

Art. 21. We, all members of the class, do sympathetically leave to the long-suffering 
faculty the hopes of a more brilliant class for 1928. 

As the supply of our possessions is exhausted, we leave with all what we will always 
retain — our love for Saint Mary's and best wishes for its future. 



Signed and sealed by 

Witnessed by: 
M. Royali. 
F. MaRRiner 



Frances Sl'Ott Brown, Testator. 



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Fifty-throe 







Louise Jouner 

MOST DIGNIFIED 

'■■■■ "&a&£&> 

Virginia Evans 

MOCT ENTHUSIASTIC 



Olzie Rodman 



■ 



MOST TALKATIVE 
96ST 



V 



Senior Statistics 



Fifty-four 



Seniors' Diary 



September 


15 


September 


21 


November 


3 


November 


13 


December 


3 


January 


19-22 


February 


20 


March 


30 


April 


6 



Seniors began taking their privileges. 

Seniors began setting the example for the school. 

Louise Joyner missed a question in Economics class. 

It rained yesterday and all the girls had a bath with the tub full. 

Jennie Trotter and Jonnie Muse stayed on the campus today. 

Students had an opportunity to tell the teachers a few things (Exams). 

Edna F. Harris didn't go down to court today (Edwards and Cain). 

Roy Arthur did not ride by Saint Mary's today. 

Mr. Way told a new joke. 




LEST we Forget 




m 



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Fifty-five 








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Miss Monroe. Junior Adviser 

Junior Class 

Colors: Green and White Flower: Marechal Neil Rose 

Motto: Ever onward, ever upward 










Elizabeth Platt Phoebe Randolph Hardixg Martha P. Archbell 

President Vice President Secretary-Treasurer 

Havana, Cuba Washington, N. C. Elizabeth City, N. C. 



, Student Council Members 

ERMA WlLLTAJtS Het.ex Andri"s 

Elizabeth Platt 



fci 



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Fifty-eight 



Helen Andhus 
Germantown, Pa. 



Josef i i i n e Battle 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Luna Byiiu 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Sydney Curry 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Elizabeth East 
Staunton, Va. 



Sarah EJvtns 

Spartanburg, S. C. 



Sarah Falkner 
Golclsboro, N. C. 



Julia Gahxard 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Harriet Garrett 
Williamsburg, Va. 





:'3 p 

i 
if 



MP 




Mary Gates 
South Boston, Va. 



Sarah Glover 
Charlotte, N. C. 



Katherine Gregory 
Charleston, S. C. 



Leora Hiatt 
High Point, N. C. 



Frances Horuie 
Morganton, N. C. 



Elizabeth Hoggard 

Wilmington, N. C. 



Mabel Horne 
East La Porte, N. C. 



Elizabeth Johnson 

Eustis. Florida 



Corinne Marks 
Rosemary, X. C. 



V 



Sixty 



Kathleen May 
Gril'ton, N. C. 



Mary Nelson 
Newtmryp'ort, Mass. 



Alice Rankin 
Wilson, N. C. 



Pattik Smith 
Somerville, N. J. 



Virginia Street 
Jersey City, N. J. 



Norma Turner 
Wilmington, N. C, 



Jean Wickeksham 
Norfolk, Va. 



Ehma Williams 
Kenansville, N. C. 







Sixty-one" 




Conditional Juniors 




Eiiythe Barker 








Margaret Harris 


Isabel Baylor 








Virginia Lawrence 


Anna Bohannon 








Angie Luther 


Anne Browder 








Olivia McKinne 


Katiierine Duff 








Mildred Price 


Emma Dunn 








Sara Redding 


Allie Lee Graham 








Leslie Ritter 


Elizabeth Graham 








Jewel Sandlin 


Julia Gregory 








Elizabeth Smith 


Emily Halliburton 








Josephine Williams 


Miriam Hardin 








Dorothy Yale 


Virginia 


Norton 




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JUNIOES 



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Sophomore Class 

Colors: Purple and Lavender Flower: Violet 

Motto: Aim kigh but reach higher 

Class Officers 

Virginia Taylor President 

Annie Crewe Warren : Yiee President 

Julia Texie Boggess Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Holt Class Adviser 

Student Council Member 
Virginia Taylor 

Class Roll 

Autrey Farmer Love . Taylor, M. S. 

Beaman Freeman. A. Mangum Taylor. V. 

Bennett Freeman. M. Mathieson Thomas 

Benton Galloway Mitehiner Tillery 

Boggess Green, E. Morgan Tucker, C. 

Carlyle Hay Peal Tucker. S. 

Clarkson Hooker Perry Webb, F. 

Cleve Hoover Redtern Webb, M. C. 

Dickerson Johnson. J. Stewart Womble 

Erwin Jordan Tate Young 




FROSHi 



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Freshman Class 

Cor.ons: Ebony and Gold Flower: Blackcyed Susan 

Motto: Climb tho the rocks be rugged 

Class Officers 

Margaret Cameron President 

Nancy Burrage Vice President 

Arcana Fleming : Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Roberts Class Adviser 

Student Council Member 
Margaret Cameron 

Class Roll 
Burrage Hayne Montgomery Thornberi-y 
Cameron, II. Hazell McGill. B. A. Turner 
Dunn, W. Huie Oakley Weaver 
Eaton Hutchinson Pitt Webb. E. 
Fox James Reitzel Wheaton 
Gibson Jones, E. Reynolds Wiley- 
Godfrey Metcalfe Stair Williams, M. 



V 



Sixty-eight 



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Preps 

Colors: Pink and Blue 
Motto: Children should he seen and not heard 

Class Officers 

Ethel Kramer President 

Shirley Noble Vice President 

Aline Meade : Secretary Treasurer 

Miss Ruef Class Adviser 

Student Council Member 
Ethel Kramer 

Class Roll 

Bailey, J. Burgert. J. Curtis Haigh Kramer Oestmann 

Bailey. M. Burnette Fairfax Hamilton Lindsey Pleasants 

Belvin Cameron, T. Foley Hardin, C. May Shore 

Booth Cobh - Fowlkes Hester Mitchell Storr 

Burgert, A. Cornick Glenn Hoyt McGill. A. Trent 

Godley Jeffress Noble 

Seventy 





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Day Pupils 




Acton, A. 
Barber. E. 
Byrd, L. 
Cameron, T. 
Cadthen, E. 
Cornick. V. 
Crowder, E. 
Cubby, S. 
Duke, R. 
Evans. A. L. 
Farmer, L. 
Freeman, B. 






Gaillard, J. 
Galloway, M. 
Hazell, N. 
Hltddleston, M. 
Lee, V. 
Love, H. 
Mason. M. 
Meekins, A. 
Mitchiner. L. 
Morgan, C. 
McGill. A. 
Owens. G. 
Rimmer, M. 



Rogers. E. 
Rogers. M. 
Rose. M. S. 
Sandlin. J. 
Seelv, A. 
Steele. C. 
Storr. E. 
Tillery, M. 
Tucker. C. 
Tucker. S. 
Womblk. S. 
Workman, M. 






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Mary Hunter Cross 
Expression 



Mary Margaret Muse 
Expression 










eventy-three 



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Su/.ANNK TXJCKER 

Ar* 



M A RG A R ET C LA R K SO X 

Art 

Mildred Price 
Art 



V 




The School Council Officers 

FACULTY 

Mu. Way Chairman 

Miss Holt Secretary 

HONOR COMMITTEE 

Mela Royali President 

Fan x ik Aikek Secretary 



Mu. Way 
Miss Albehtson 
Miss Holt 
Miss Davis 
Miss Monroe 
Miss Roberts 



MEMBERS 
Mr. Ticker 
Mr. Stone 

Margaret Burckmyer 
Laura Owens 
Mela Royai.l 
Fannie Aiken 



Elizabeth Platt 
Helen Andrus 
Erma Williams 
Virginia Taylor 
Margaret Cameron 
-- Ethel 




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Pan-Archon Council 

Mela Royall President of the Student Body 

Fannie Aiken Senior President 

Elizabeth Platt Junior President 

Virginia Taylor Sophmore President 

Margaret Cameron Freshman President 

Ethel Kramer Prep. President 

Frances Marriner Editor-in-Chief of the Annual 

Margaret Burckmyer Business Manager of the Annual 

Laura Macdonald E. A. P. President 

Edna Faust Harris Sigma Lambda President 

Margaret Godfrey Sigma President 

Mildred Weaver Hit President 

Rebekaii Waddell Editor-in-Chief the Bulletin 

Margaret Clarkson President of the Church School Service League 

Sally Satterthwaite President of the Altar Guild 

-""--> President of the Collet/e Club 

Joyce Broadhurst ~ ' 

President of Letter Club 



\ 



^atntilarg'B ^r^nl iallrtm 



ALUMNAE NUMBER 



December, 1926 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Series 16, No. 1 



STAFF 

ALUMNAE NEWS ' h«** dowch 



Clmrcli 



I Nina Cooper, '17, whose marriage to 
iMr. Richard H. Thornton took place in 
August, Is now living i" Mew York City 
ut 17 MorningsWo Drive. Mr. Thornton 
Is with Henry Holt's Publishing Com- 
puny. 

Elizabeth Hlcltei'son, '23, is teaching 
school at Marlon, N. 0. 

Lucy Kimball, '23, of Henderson, N. C, 
was recently Installed a: 
Young People's Servici 
State. The installation 
elected officers was held 
l In Raleigh. 

Mary Hoke, 'IS. Is at home again In 
Raleigh after a summer spent traveling 
extensively in Europe. 

Tin- engagement una recently boon an- 
nounced of Elizabeth Huberts, '23, of 
Eocnton, N, C. to Mr. Fred D. Wood. 

Daisy Cooper, "JH, who passed the bar 
examination in January, received the de- 
gree of doctor of laws from the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, being the first 
woman to receive this degree since the 
flve-year course has been required. 

On September 10. Mary Powell, '24, kV 
gave « n;iciv announ cing the engagement' 

Ma, ROfi E MARrE- 

of ' Saint .11, 



■} ■ 



FRANCES SCOTT 1JH0W!< 

PiiomtE Ranlhili'h Harping 

EUZABBTH JOlt.NSO 

Sara Falkknlr Literary Edit. 

Nancy Burgage. ■j gjjL' , a»o' Xacx Edit' 
Harriet GAiutKTT.fJ^ Society Editor ^ 



CLASSES 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



Ellen I.iiwis... 



W. T. Dortch 
James Lewis (M 
Maui Royal {E 
Frank Webb (t 



VIS! 

Tnyloi 



rbits 

(Mary Roi 
cabeth Lew 



Typhi urer xbere wei 
JUarjorlQ Hunter 

forced to leave i 

L Wil- Wlth f 



! year's Jour- 
u, president; 
resident, and 
y iiml licns- 
i of ua until 
Sublet! were 

1 count lit illness. 
Ipe they will re- 

Mlss Houcben, 



Mt-lkk, 

l-ill'.'tnll, 

beth T 



and our sponsor, Mr. Stone, we expect to 

(jyinmu a »> _■_"*'" ■" '< •"*»■ accomplish great things during the year. 

(i_.citrn.ii> uiu-.i.i. urs. with the ever loyal support of Miss 

. ',' "",. ,. ..'"'. Albert son. Mhi Unit and all members of 

MaL-^n _" rk ,' ... '". , lie faculty, and the cooperation of the 

'■■" '' ' " J. ' " '' ' htudcnr Inxly, u.- MNp"<_l lliis, our Senior 

I'i ,uii-p , Mi> "'"'" ' ™T* y c nr at Saint Mary's, to be one of the 

,r: ' . - i '"^ : ""' ** happiest in our lives — never to be for- 

".Madou Lee, 'Eliza- «°V«-. 

o\ bnuon, Annie Eat- 

rtf^t* TO, Marie Grot. 
' v \*=^ oV.Hgomery, Lucy j ^JP^ t "<(& J^Qatt as president, 




' '""Sot »'Wro ,„ ^ -" -^TofT 1 "' ''«■-,"'■', Oo Tbor«,l»y. S,w™l«, 



:sz£vs£P' 



begun by the' 
Way greeted the 1 



SNICKS' TALK 

rnher lOttl, the S5th 

officially 



m.n_r.¥RT.-\i"\V-f_lT.l. PARTY f i, T vlce. n _ ,-...-■ y ;ir - L .?si»«: ... '<■ , ./''. Bishop reuk-l 



OLD-CrRL-XEW-OIRL PARTY' 

Ou Saturday night, Septembet^S|tbe 

.'W girls were escort eil tn (heir OW^Hep- 

tlon in the halls of St. Mary'S^At B 

O'clock each old girl called for h"date 

and giiltlcil her through the reception 

Tills was composed of Mr. and Mrs. 

Miss Alherlson. Miss Holt, all new 

ers of the faculty nod the presl- 

cif the different organization's of Hie 

I. After this formal introduction 

St. Mary's society, came a more 

rtnlumcut, An orehes- 



me- 



sans- ,-_.,- >w 



; „,-. Bishop Penick told us what we should 
Rouna lbi . <i,,J r >»< strive alter wlLlle wo are attending Saint 
itide 



11 1U , „rt 



^^3^-^ 



1 ^..„ w»9 <°.,.,„.s. "1?" 






ln.t Stnlr, Mary Louise James and Ancle V; ,, V' Mavy s " l ,,,1,1" V 1 

Luther, violinist*: Virginia N»rt..n and ( ' i1 ' , „i^ ' 11 ""' ,i tV-' sll "l 

Margaret Cameron, twrformers on the I c1i '*-,iy »°H f t , Ulf' 1W v. 

uktM.nd of r.dly Piirrot, giiw.r.tist. iilay.-d Mr. v \' ; "ft "•'*.„, ,-bor'Al \ 



•=srd loyalty In portlcn- 
iar— -hrt-nlty to the school, its truditions; 
loyaltv" to our friends, our society, our 
ideals". Although Bishop Penlek sjiolce 
very briefly, he gave us a message that 
was very helpful, nud one to carry with 
'M uh throughout the year, 

^ 7ti0*£ '/t% ( . ' r '" ( i' 'HOOL COUNCIL 

5*o#,„ Council is composed of the 



\«c«" ,v 



oVrt \ 



■A- t* 



Polly Parrot, giizunti 
jiikk fur dancing. 

Margaret Montgomery 'gave a solo 
dance. This was lininuuaely popular, and 
she wos repeatedly called back for encores. 
Then the old girls served tbelr gnosis 
punch and cake. They nlso gave thein 
fifteen rnhs, which were courteously re- 
turned. The orchestra struek up "Home 
Sweet Home" at l):3f), whleb brought the 



" .,* ol 
ispcr 



It" /) r *■<. ramlttee from the faculty 
Jj a "°rt- Honor Committee from the 



was t 

,dd\-\ mltte. 

,Vled\ dents, tl 






Marg. Godfrey: "We give up; whose Is 



mhern of the Executivo Com- 
L . the RCelor, the Dean of Sru- 

i' Academic Hea.l, the Business 
Mr Si one, Miss Dnvls, MiST 
nd Ml-s Bobe tfs>fcaf> — 
mber •( tTn- uouoi Ci 
. ....i i, Aiken, Peggy Bnrcb 
Fdna Pnust Harris. Laura Owens, 
Rovall. Hoi. n Ali'lros, Eli/.abetli Pntlt, 
Crtna Williams, Betty GreCU, Me^n,e. 
Taylor, Margnret Cameron, and EetbelrL 
Kramer. 








Seventy-seven 



p 


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111 II 




1 J|l ( "^.rf &^l IV \ JKiT' '^^ ' '1%' M K. M Itf^^^v 4«fc 




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Altar Guild 



Sallie Satterthwaite President 

Ethel Shelton Vice President 

Miss Bason First Supervisor 

Miss Roberts Second Supervisor 




Aiken, F. B. 
Aniirus, H. 
Badham, H. 
Battle, J. 
Boggess, J. 

BOHANNON, A. 
BURCKMYER. P. 

Carlton, M. 
Cason, A. 



~^> 



MEMBERS 
Ci.arksox, M. 
Cross, M. H. 
Crudtjp, M. 
Doar, H. 
Dortch. H. 
Duff, K. 
Evans. V. 
Garrett. H. 
Harding, p. 
Harris, E. F. 



Johnston. A. 
Jones. M. D. 
Joyneii. L. 
Marriner. P. 
Owens, L. 
Rodman, O. 

ROYALL. M. 

Shelton. A. 

SllELTON. E. 



Seventy-eight 




Choir Members 

Mr. Jonl's Director and Organist 

Miss Cheatham Assistant Organist 

Miss Fielding Leading Soprano 

Miss Hotjchen Leading Alto 

Mary Huntek Choss Crueifer 



Andeus, H. 

BOHANNON. A. 

Booth. H. 
Cameron, M. 
Comer, B. 
Choss, M. 
Duff. K. 

DlCKEHSON, M. 

Evans. V. 



MEMBERS 
Fielding, E. 
Gueen. F. 
Harding, P. 
Houchen, G. 
James. M. L. 
Jones, M. D. 
Laverty. A. 
McKinnk. 0. 
Mathieson, M. 
Montgomeky, M. 



Nelson. M. 
Platt. E. 
Satt'erthwaite. 
Shore, F. 
Sit elton, E. 
Stair, D. 
Warren. A. C. 
Waddell, R. 
Williams, .1. 




r§5k 



^ 













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Seventy-nine 



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School Orchestra 



Virginia Taylor Leader 

Stella Wolfe , Manager 



Dunn, E. 
Cameron, M. 
Hayne, S. 



Luther. A. 
Norton, V. 

Stair, D. 



Webb, M. C. 









~~^> 



^ik <?%> 
W 



V. 






Kit-lit J 




- 



1 C i?"vp.i 



Colors: Green and Gold 



Epsilon Alpha Pi 



Motto: Esse Quam Videri 



Flower: Jonquil 



OFFICERS 

Laura Macdonald President 

Maktha Jones Vice President 

Phoebe Harding Secretary 

Mary Margaret Muse Treasurer 

Miss Cook Faculty Adviser 




Andrus, H. 
Abohbell, M. 
Badham, H. 
Baylor, I. 
Beacham, E. 
Belvin, M. 

BOGGESS, J. 

Booth, H. 

BROADHl'RST, J. 

Brown, P. 
Btjbrage, N. 

BURNETTE, L. 

Cannon, H. 
Clarke, I. 
Cleye, P. 
Cross, M. H. 
Cbudt/p, M. 

DOBTCH, H. 

DUEF, K. 

Dunn, M. 
Dunn, E. S. 
East, E. 
Eaton, E. 
Evans, V. 
Falkner, S. 
Fleming, A. 
Foley, M. J. 
Garrett, H. 



MEMBERS 

Gibson, E. 
Glenn, K. 
Gloyer, S. 
Godfrey, M. 
Godley, N. 
Graham, a. 
Gregory. J. 
Hallybirton, E. 
Hardin, M. 
Harding, P. 
Hooker, P. 
Horne, M. 
Hayne, S. 
Hoyt. B. 
James, M. L. 
Jeffbess, D. 
Johnson, E. 
Jones, E. 
Jones, M. D. 
Kramer, E. 
Lamb, a. h. 
Lancaster, S. 
Laverty, A. 
Lawton, C. 
Little, M. 
Luther, A. 
Mac-Donald, L. 



&A£): 



Marriner, 1'. 
Matthews, P. 
May, K. 
Metcalk. 11. 
mitchell, v. 
Montgomery, 11. 
Muse, M. 
Mathis, E. 
Mi Kinne, O. 
Nelson, M. 
Parrott, P. 
Pitt, M. B. 
Platt, E. 
Rankin, a. 
Read, M. 
Bitter, L. 
Rodman, O. 
Satterthwaite, 
Summers, F. 
Stair, D. 
Thornberry, E. 
Thurman, M. 

Tl RNER. E. 

Turner, K. 
Taylor, M. S. 
Webb, M. C. 
Wiley. E. 
Williams. M. 






Eighty -two 




Eighty- three 




Marshals 



Phoebe Harding 

Josephine Battle.. 



Elizabeth Pi.ati — Chief, E. A. P. 

E. A. P. 

E. A. P. 



Margaret Harris 

Elizabeth Hoggarr.. 



..Sigma Lambda 
Sigma Lambda 





Inter-Society Debaters 

Query: Resolved, That flic United states .should grant independence to the Philippines 

Negative 



immediately. 



Affirmative 
Martha Jones 

Jn,TA BOGOKS-S7-.-7---.. 



..E. A. P. Elizabeth Smith.. 
..E. A. P. Pvi in-: Smith 



Sigma Lambda 
Sigma Lambda 






Eighty-four 



Sonnet to an Inkwell 

(Winning Poem in Inter-society Contest) 

A jet-black chrysalis of unformed thought, 
And life within, whose Stygian fluid holds 
Reality, which from the Dream is wrought. 
What stripes or marks of power its girth enfolds 
Until the clam disturbed and long sleep broken, 
Lie waiting mastery by human mind — 
Thought's butterfly impaled on pen, a token 
Of quivering, poised conceits vouchsafed mankind. 

By you, the fleeting, transitory mood 

Of my ephemeral whim is swiftly changed, 

Is startled from its latent lassitude 

And gayly garbed or primly rearranged; 

Magician Mother, through your butterflies 

New worlds resplendent skim before my eyes. 

Phoebe Randolph Harding, E. A. P. 



3 mEBttm 



w 



f 



Eighty-five 



"0, Crow, Cock!" 

(Winning short story) 

By 

Phoebe Randolph. Harding. E. A. P. 



ft 
!fcf 



THE small swinging lamp swayed fitfully with the lurching of the vessel. Its smoky 
rays flickered now and then to a far corner of the hold, and played over a huddled 
mass cowering there. Then a more pronounced lurch and the lamp light caught the 
outline of two human figures lying prostrate upon the rough flooring. The first was 
bared to the waist, and gave the appearance of a common sailor. The other, in the 
garb of an Anglican priest, was the taller of the two and, in spite of the cramped 
position in which he lay, his face seemed strangely placid. 

A hideous roll of the vessel flung the figures far to the center of the ship. There was 
a sound of dragging chains. The lamp flared up for an instant. A glimmer of light 
veered, and shot back. In that time the ankles of both men were seen, fettered by 
heavy rings to the side of the hold. 

A tortured groan came from the swollen and darkening lips of the half nude figure. 

"A friend! — this Black Baird, with his traitorous flag, his damnable strength." He 
turned desparingly to his companion. "Sir, what think you has befallen our friends? 
So near to Bath, and then — disaster! The skirmish was so short. I can remember 
nothing after I saw the demon swarm over our ship's sides. There was blow, and only 
crashing, thundering blackness. Master Hunt, could any of the men have escaped 
with their lives or did they go down with the ship?" 

The flickering lamp swung toward them again and swayed back, leaving hot, black 
darkness. Out of that darkness came the even voice of the minister. 

"Would that I could tell thee, my son, but I am less skilled than thou in the matters 
of the waves. This only do I know, that within God's keeping, all that believe in Him 
shall be safe, — even so you and L He will strengthen us." 

They fell silent, each lost in his own thoughts of the cheerless prospect before cap- 
tives on a pirate ship. They had no means of knowing, except as the rolling of the 
ship increased, that sailing down the Pamlico, they had reached the tough sound. The 
creaking of the sails and far away cry of the drunken sailors scarcely reached the hot, 
close "prison of the captives. Sleep seemed impossible; yet physical fatigue and the ex- 
cessive heat brought a semi-torpor upon the two men. 

Quite suddenly the minister was roused by the noise of the hatch sliding back. A 
draft of salt, cold air swept clear his brain, and he raised himself on his elbow. Then 
it was that he saw Baird, coming uncertainly down the rope ladder, lowered into the 
hold. He was close followed by two other rascals, and the trio seemed intent upon 
search for something. Master Hunt half suspected that, already under the influence 
of liquor, they sought a new supply among the plundered casks from the other ship. 
Nor was he far wrong. Baffled in their search the men became more and more angry, 
but one groped in the darkness away from his companions and down to the part of 
the hold where the prisoners lay. The minister by the breadth and height of the 
looming figure made out, with his dark-accustomed eyes, that this was Baird, himself. 
Advancing, with his lurching gait, Baird abruptly stumbled over the two shackled men. 
A hideous torrent of abuse twisted the cruel mouth. His companions hastened toward 
him carrying the lanthorn. 

"Dogs of the gutter," snarled Baird down upon the bound minister, "Wait till I 
have taught ye something more than to lie snivelling like a cur. Ye'll hear no more 
of the milksop of a God ye were a-praying to this morning afore we overhauled your ship. 
Ye'll be glad enough for the God Baird'll be to ye! A parson," — with a wink at his 
companions— "loves a full paunch more than any plunge into the sea, I've always found! 
Yes, ye'll forget your twaddle of a God all right, and now — ." 

But something in the tense face of the clergyman stopped his flow of words. The 
light of the place, imperfect as it was, showed a pale, imperious composure on the 
minister's face. Only his eyes burned out from their sockets like scorching flames. 









"V 



Eiffhty-six 



"Mind, man what thou sayest!" 

The voice was low pitched, hut it fell upon the group like pelting stones. The minis- 
ter's companion, half afraid, looked toward him. 

"And mark ye this, infidel. The God of my fathers never deserts his faithful people. 
But His vials of wrath are swift outpoured upon those who defile His Holy Name; 
those who mock Him. Before thou hear the cock crow, thy sins will be visited 
upon thee. Remember that well, for God hath spoken through me, his servant." 

During the passionate speech Baird had looked upon the minister with mocking 
eyes. "Hear, hear," cried he to his followers. "A prophet come to judge us!" 
Scornfully, — "Cock crow — a joke indeed. Why 'tis scarce an hour till dawning, and 
upon Pamlico Sound, few cocks venture to greet the day." 

The three rocked with appreciation of the evident absurdity of such a prophecy. 
Yet in the drunken mirth so different from the first outburst of black anger, it w,as 
notable that he who had been chief spokesman, chief scorner. did not join in as freely 
as his speech would have warranted. Under the bristling black beard, Baird's face 
paled perceptibly. Truly the minister had successfully pierced the armour of a hardened 
fighter who stood unflinching before scenes of rawest murder, yet who was wholly 
ruled by the clutching tenacles of ignorant superstition. The shadowy, seemingly 
impossible threat of swift destruction had possession of him more firmly than the 
casual onlooker might have observed. 

"We'll leave ye here to your pleasure," Baird at length ground out vindictively. 
"I've duties above," and he staggered off, close followed by his sailor companions. 

The darkness closed in as the lamp was carried away. The two prisoners looked after 
the vanishing figures clambering up through the hatch, which was inadvertantly left 
unclosed. Through the aperture, the two prisoners could see the velvet blackness of the 
sky fading gradually into the semi-light just preceding dawn. The sailor turned, half 
awed by the prophecy of the minister. 

"Master Hunt, with what certainty ye spoke just now! Dost truly think that destruc- 
tion will come upon Baird before cock crow? or was it merely to frighten the fellow?" 
He peered anxiously at the priest. 

"I know it," the tall man said calmly. 

Simultaneously with the words came a hoarse shout above decks; "A sail, ho! A sail! 

Black Baird, who by this time had gained the deck and stood joking a bit forcedly 
with one of his men, looked toward where the watch pointed. Surely, a sail there was, 
which like a winged phantasy, cut through the soft grey light. Baird struggled for 
speech. Coming as the sail had with the words of the minister still ringing in his 
ears, they brought on the pirate a sudden nausea foreign to his usual swaggering 
bravadocio. The crew standing ready to tack and over-haul the newcomer were start- 
lingly taken aback when Baird shouted thickly. 

"Clap on all sail. Head for the island!" 

The Demon superstition had him in hand. The insane desperate desire to hear the, 
cock crow had driven all thought of plunder or fight from the bull's mind. Self- 
preservation must be gained at all cost! 

It seemed strange, however, that the crew should comply so submissively when it 
meant the loss of untold wealth. Perhaps the words of Master Hunt repeated garrulously 
by the two companions of Baird to several fellows above decks had impressed the 
minds of more than one of the crew more seriously than they cared to believe. Certainly 
there was little or no hesitation in running up the sails. Each man at his post apprehen- 
sively and zealously strove to keep the ship in the lead. The cove at the mouth of the 
island gave a sense of refuge, of security, they did not feel here. 

Baird watched the line of land come nearer and nearer. Reach it; hear the cock 
crow, and the charm would be dissolved. He could afford then to laugh at his folly 
maybe even to sally forth against the unknown vessel. But certainly now, safety. Such 
thoughts ran in rapid succession through his mind as he watclied the approaching vessel: 
Evidently she had a very grave interest in the pirate ship for still following in her wake 
the pursuer crept closer and closer. Suddenly a white spurt of smoke showed above 










Eighty-seven 



B 

t; 



m 



Uii'W. 



*%& 






her deck, and the water near the pirate ship was churned into white foam. Baird 
was being fired upon. 

The cannon of the pirate ship were hastily being drawn up. It was to be a fight to 
the finish. The island showed almost malevolent from its distance. It seemed to 
divine that the refuge of its sandy, sparsely inhabitated stretches was being denied 
in the hour of need to the man who so absolutely ruled its inhabitants, hand and mouth. 

The grey sky was paling. The attacking ship fired again, this time striking Baird's 
ship broad side. 

"Demons — drive her on — The cove! crow! O crow cock! 

The pirate captain's half intelligible gibberings were hardly heeded. The crew in- 
stinctively had headed the ship for the island. Every puff of wind must be conserved, 
used to urge on the vessel. What few tended the cannon aimed wildly. The crazed 
wildness of the captain's behavior had fallen on the crew! The island seemed farther 
away than ever — "0 crow, cock." The growing dawn appeared to supply the English 
ship with fresh vigor. There was a splintering crash. Every timber of Baird's ship 
shivered. Water oozed into the yawning seams and began to trickle down into the hold. 
The two prisoners gazed at the rising tide, the sailor grim lipped, fearful-eyed; the 
clergyman resolute and stern. They could only wildly conjecture what might be happen- 
ing above them. Could it be help and would that help come more swiftly than the dark 
streams trickling down the hold's side? Again they were shaken by a heavy impact. 
There was a sound of trampling feet upon deck. Men were boarding the ship and through 
the open hatch they could make out figures in hand combat. The sailor strained at his 
chains in vain. The sea slowly, stealthily crept in until the captives were half covered 
with the slimy water. It seemed hours that the awful confusion swept on above them. 
Neither prisoner spoke. Words were futile things just then. 

Above, the ship's deck swarmed with human figures. The victorious ship lay grap- 
pled to the pirate vessel. The Englishmen were fighting with the pirate crew in 
conflict short, swift, and deadly. Blood pulsed in long red-black streams from still. 
prostrate bodies. Lightening-like play of rapiers, lithe body movements made shocking 
contrast with the raw, still Death, and the tortured anguish of the wounded. At the 
bow of the vessel where Baird had stood were now two figures fighting like animals. 
Baird strangely white, his shock of disheveled black hair standing out wildly. His 
opponent tall, quick and muscular, by his dress plainly showed himself to be the captain 
of the English boat. Baird breathing heavily lunged fiercely against his enemy. The 
captain sidestepped. Fear clutched again at the heart of the pirate. So to Baird not half 
sobered from his night's carousal, pressed by a formidable fear the prophecy of the min- 
ister recurred again and again like a funeral knell. Baird made the motion that cost 
him his life. He turned his rolling, bloodshot eyes from his opponent but a fraction of 
a second to glance instinctively toward the island. 

"0 Crow, Cock." 

The English captain saw his opening and thrust. Baird rolled on the deck like a 
leaden thing. The eyes stared, the tongue protruded, it was the end. No, the body 
moved. Swiftly the bloody rapier of the watching captain severed the ugly head from 
the reddened neck. The head moving with the movement of the ship and rolled under 
the splintered railing making a sudden splatter. The captain turned for another victim. 
But the worst of the fight was already over. The English had gained a decided victory 
and it was necessary that all captives and the wounded be removed to the English ship. 

One English sailor fired with desire for discovery peered down with the black hold. 
"A capital place for plunder," thought he. Any other thoughts were then struck from 
his mind tor he heard a weird cry from below. Calling another sailor the two climbed 
down and waded about the hold. There they found the fettered prisoners. It was short 
work to free them from the rusty iron bands. Standing deep in water the captives 
stretched their cramped, stiff limbs, then strained up the- narrow ladder into the red- 
dening morning__and the gory confusion that reigned above decks. 

"Master Hunt" criedthe captain and fell upon the minister's neck. "Thanks be. you 
live. The men who reached me at Bath were not certain what had become of you." 
And they embraced with unembarrassed emotion. 






^s 



Eighty-eight 



But there was yet more work to be done. Most of the pirates were clamped in irons 
upon the English ship, but one poor fellow who had not long to live was placed upon a 
pallet spread on the deck that he might have as comfortable a bed as possible. The 
English ship had weathered the conflict well, but several minor repairs necessitated 
drawing into the near-by cove. Master Hunt's companion was anxious too, for ex- 
ploration for Black Baird had fired his imagination with dreams of pirate hoards. 
Accordingly the ship was put to port and while workmen repaired her damage a small 
party led by the sailor and the minister went ashore. 

They found for the most part a desolate enough stretch of land inhabited by two or 
three families who eked out their existence upon the small part of the island they had 
cultivated. The men were tacturn, answering none of the questions of the strangers 
until hearing from the captain of the horrible battle, they broke their silence and 
babbled as if they had been freed from some impending doom. Black Baird had truly 
ruled them hand and mouth. 

The captain looked about with interest at the scrubby vegetation and drab little 
houses. "What did Baird call his little kingdom?" he asked a native. But there seemed 
to be no real name. Baird's Retreat, the pirates called it, and this was its only name. 

"Ho!" quoth the captain. "Then we'll change its name, what say you men?" 

Quick as a flash spoke up the sailor. He glanced at the priest. "Let it be "O Crow 
Cock! said he and when the remarkable tale had been recounted it was with one accord 
that the band agreed on the name. 

The hot sun beat down upon the water by the time the exploring party pushed off from 
the shore. They found the ship' almost repaired and ready to return to Bath. Clamber- 
ing aboard they saw that the sick pirate had been moved under a sheltering tarpaulin 
and one of the sailors seeing the priest went swiftly to him. 

"Sir, the man is dying. After your departure he lay like one whose spirit is almost 
gone. Then suddenly just after he'd been moved to the shade he roused up, pointing 
at the water. One of us ran to him but he only babbled incoherently as if in delirium. 
We soothed him once, but he soon started up and cried out again. We have tried to 
quiet him but cannot. Will, you come. Sir, and see what can be done? 

The minister did not hesitate. He reached the sick man's side and took his hands 
into his own. 

"What troubles you?" The pirate turned upon him, "Black Baird's Head"— tremblingly, 
"The Head of Baird! Twice I have seen it float by. His hair strings out behind; his 
eyes look toward the island and I have seen his foaming mouth's slow moving. Each 
time he cries out, 'Oh, Crow, Cock.' I saw it I tell you." The man's voice rose in a 
frightful wail. 

The minister attempted to calm the fellow. He spoke softly to him — "Faugh! 
Imagination makes cowards of us all. For shame. Thou art a man. Forget the absurd 
dream of thy fevered fancy. 'Twas naught went by, in truth." 

The even tone, the sincerity of his voice, in some way quieted the sick man. He lay 
passive, touched by the finger of suffering. He seemed almost asleep. The minister 
turned away for a moment. Then a hoarse cry came from the bed. The man was bolt 
upright. His eyes were glued in fright to a part of the water not far from the ship. 

"He is there! The cock will not crow. Master. Look! Look! His eyes are stabbing 
me — ! With a long drawn shudder the man fell back. The spark of life was gone. 
And there were those of the English crew who, following the pointed finger of the man, 
swore that they saw the horrible head of Black Baird rolling soddenly upon the waters, 
his cruel mouth writhing, twisting, and they said they heard the words, "0 Crow, Cock!" 
issue from it. Howbeit others, and the priest among them, claim that it was only the 
tri-cornered hat of the captain who discovered it to be missing several hours later. 

Yet, even today the natives recount this legend, pointing as a proof of its truth to IJie.. 
present name of their home. Ocracoke Island. 




Colors: Purple and Gray 



Sigma Lambda 



Motto: Lit With the Sun 



Flower: Yellow J asm ine 



OFFICERS 

Edna Faust Harris President 

Rebekah Waddeij Viee President 

Martha Thigpen Secretary 

Julia B. Hicks Treasurer 

Miss Agek Faculty Adviser 



AIKEN", P. 

Barker, E. 

BOHANNAN, A. 
BUECKMYKR, M. 
BAILY, J. 
BAILY, M. 
BURGET, M. 
Cameron. M. 
Cason, A. 
Carlton, M. 
Comer, B. 
Curtis, C. 
Dando, G. 
Dkkerson. M. 

DOAR, H. 

Harrow, M. 
Evins, S. 
FOWLKES, F. 
Fairfax, S. 
Fox, M. 
Greene, F. 
Harris, E. F. 
Hicks, J. B. 
Huie, M. 

HlATT, L. 

Hoggard, E. 




MEMBERS 

Hay, H. 
Harris, M. 
Hardin, C. 
Hamilton, F. 
Hutchinson, E. 
Haigh, F. 
Johnston, A. G. 
Joiner, L. 
Jordan, f. 
Knapi', F. 
Lawrence, V. 
Lindsey, M. 
Lewis, E. 
Matthews. F. 
MrGii.L, B. 
Moore, R. 
Norton, V. 
Noble, S. 
Oestman, m. 
Owens, L. 
Peal, V. 
Perry, F. 
Pruitt, B. 

PUGH, J. 

Pasteur, 1». 

ROYALL, M. 
REITZEIi, E. 



REDFKRN, A. 

Redding, S. 
Shelton, A. 
Shelton. E. 
Shore, P. 
Smith. P. 
Street, V. 
Smith. E. 
Taylor, V. 
Thigi'en, M. 
Trotter, J. 
Trent. E. 
Taylor. E. 
Tate, M. 
Tyson. V. 
Thomas. E. 
Waddell, R. 
Weaver. M. 
Williams, E. 
Wickersham, J. 
Washbirne. M. 
Webb. E. 
Webb, F. 
Willard. B. 
Warrkn, A. C. 
Yale, D. 



Ninety 




&"-.'. 



Ninety-one 



np HE Sigma Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Societies maintain interest and 
A spirit in their activities by frequent contests arranged during the year. A feeling 
of friendly rivalry is created by the competition thus afforded. The annual contests count 
towards the winning of a trophy. Each contest won brings a certain number of points 
to its society. They are as follows: 

Model meeting 15 

Debate 30 

Short Story 10 

Essay 10 

Poetry 1U 

The Model Meeting is composed of a business part and program. The business meet- 
ing is judged primarily by the merits of its Parliamentary proceedings; the program 
by its literary interest and execution. The debates are strictly formal discussions of 
some current topic. Two speakers from each side are chosen, the two-man rebuttle 
being used. One original short story, essay, and poem are submitted annually by each 
society to a competent judge. These complete the inter-society contests. 



life 






^> 



V 



Ninety-two 



*& 



^ 




Ninety-three 




Dramatic Club 



Mary Margabei Muse.. 
Frances Brown 



President 

Business Manager 




Andkus, H. 
Baylor, I. 
Brown, F. 
Bryant, A. 
Cross. M. H. 
Doar. H. 

DORTCH. H. 

Duff. K. 
Fai.knkr. S. 



"~^ 



MEMBERS 
Garrett. H. 
Hiatt, L. 
Hooker. P. 
Jkffress. D. 
Lamb. A. H. 
Laverty. L. 
Macdonald. L. 
Montgomery, 



Muse, M. M. 
Nelson, M. 
Noble, S. 
Norton, V. 
Owens, L. 
Redfern, A. 
Smith. M. E. 
Thomas. E. 
Webb. M. C. 



M. 




. 





Glee Club 
















ACEE 


Horne 


Montgomery 


Andrus 


Hazell 


Nelson 


Booth 


Hoggard 


Parrot 


Cameron 


HOYT 


Shore 


Comer 


Jones. M. 


Thigpen 


Evans, V. 


JOYNER 


TlIORNItKRUY 


Foley 


Lamb 


Waddell 


FOWLKES 


Laverty 


Warren 


Galloway 


Mathieson 


Webb, M. C. 


Greene. F. 


Math is 


White 


Hamilton 




Workman 





Ninety-five 




College Club 

Joyce Broadhurst Preside/it 

Laura Owens - Vice President 

Elizabeth Platt Secretary a?id Treasurer 




mm 



L~~ 



archbell 
Barker 

Beaman 

Bennett 

Boggess 

bohannon 

Broadhurst 

Browder 

Brown 

BlTRCKMYKR 

Cleve 
Comer 

DOAR 
DORTCH 
D UFF 

Dunn, E. 
DUCLN. M. 

k \st 

Evans. Y. 
Evins 
Fairfax 
Falkner 



~~^> 



MEMBERS 






Garrett 


Nelson 




Graham* A. 


Oestman 




Graham, E. 


Owens 




Gregory, J. 


Platt 




HALIiYBURTON 


Rankin 




Harris, E. 


Read 




Harris, M. 


Redfern 




Hoqgard 


Royall 




HOYT 


S HELTON, 


A. 


Huie 


Shklton, 


R. 


Jeffress 


Smith, E 




.Johnson 


Smith, P 




Jones, M. D. 


Street 




Jordan 


THZGP£N 




Joyner 


- Thomas 




K XAt'I' 


Thi/rman 




Lancaster 


Webb, M. 


('. 


Little 


\\ [i KRRSB 


\M 


Lindsky 


Wll.i IAMS 


A 


Mathis 


Williams 


B. 


Matthews 


M OLFE 




W \< 1 >ONAI.D 


Yale 





■ 



Grandma Was the Cause 



My grandma came to Saint Mary's 

Way back there in '62, 
And how she told of those good times 

Made me wish I'd been there too. 

She said that this dear Saint Mary's 

Was indeed a school of Saints, 
They never did anything naughty 

Nor thought of using paint. 

Now Grandma came in a Stage Coach, 
Girls met her at Smedes broad steps, 

Oh, Grandma's friends were all so good 
That none of them had "reps." 

My Grandma finished Saint Mary's; 

In her steps then came others, 
Along with all those dear, sweet girls 

To Saint Mary's came my mother. 

Now mother is just like grandma 

There's no place like that dear school! 

She said, "To Saint Mary's you will go 
To study hard and obey every rule." 

And when I was a girl of sixteen years 

In a big auto I came, 
To learn to love Saint Mary's 

But things were not so tame! 

I couldn't see any of those Saints 

And I was homesick too, 
I wanted to get back to mama 

For I was oh, so blue! 

Of course, I'll rave to my children 

And say I loved it so. 
And I'll send them in an airplane 

They'll love it too, I know! 

Jonnie Musk 




' "Vi 



mi 













Granddaughters and Great Granddaughters 
of Saint Mary's 



Annie Gray Johnston.. 
Fannie Bryan Aiken.... 



..President 
..Secretary 






Fannie Bryan Aiken, Brunswick, Ga. 

granddaughter of 

Frances Maud Bryan, New Bern, N. C. 

Edna Bennett, Wadesboro, N. C. 

granddaughter of 
Rosa Hammond, Anson County. 

Margaret Cameron, Raleigh, N. C. 

granddaughter of 
.Makuaket -Haywood. . Raleigh, X. C. 

daughter of 
Theodora Marshall, Raleigh, N. C. 



Martha Coffield Crudup, Kittrell. X. C 

granddaughter of 

Elizabeth Priscilla Pender. 

Tarboro, X'. C. 

Helen Dortch, Goldsboro, X. C. 

granddaughter of 
Martha Pender, Tarboro, X. C. 

daughter of 
Elizabeth Lewis. Tarboro, X. C. 

Allie Lee Graham. Clinton, X. C. 

daughter of 

Allie Lee, Clinton, X. C. 



V, 



Ni net j -eight 



Elizabeth Graham, Clinton, N. C. 

daughter of 

Allie Lee, Clinton, N. C. 

Phoebe Randolph Harding, 

Washington, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Elizabeth Hughes, Beaufort County. 

Miriam Hardin, Greensboro, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Alexixa G. Ballard, Wilmington, N. C. 

Margaret Hoover., Hartsville, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Mary Garret, Enfield, N. C. 

daughter of 
Mary Harrison, Enfield, N. C. 

Della Hassell Jefeiucss, Kinston, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Ida Lanier, Williamston, N. C. 

Annie Gray Johnston, Tarboro, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Annie Gray Chesike, Tarboro, N. C. 

daughter of 

Elizabeth Nash, Tarboro, N. C. 

Lolise Joyner, Louisburg, N. C. 

granddaughter of 
Emma Drew, Northampton County. 

Martha Dabney Jones, Norfolk, Va. 

granddaughter of 

Mary Smith Ruffes, Charles City County. 

Virginia Lawrence, Lumberton, N. C. 

daughter of 

Em.ua Norwood. Waynesville, Va. 

Ellen Dortoh Lewis. Goldsboro, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Martha Pender. Tarboro, N. C. 

daughter of 

Mildred Dortch, Goldsboro, N. C. 



Florence Matthews, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Mary E. Lindsay, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Laura Owens, Charlotte, N. C. 

daughter of 

Laura Bingham, Salisbury, N. C. 

Margaret Smedes Rose. Greenville, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Henrietta Harney, Raleigh, N. C. 

daughter of 

Margaret Harney Smedes, Raleigh, N. C. 

Pattie Sherwood Smith 

Summerville, N. J. 

granddaughter of 

Louise C. Hill. Scotland Neck, N. C. 

daughter of 

Emily Higgs, Raleigh, N. C. 

Virginia Taylor, Bronxville, N. Y. 

daughter of 

Mary M. Renn, Durham, N. C. 

Elizabeth Webb, Hillsboro, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Alice Hill, Hillsboro, N. C. 

daughter of 
Eliza Drane, Edenton, N. C. 

Freda Webb, Hillsboro. N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Alice Hill, Hillsboro, N. C. 

Elizabeth Martin Willaud 

Wilmington, N. C. 

daughter of 

Mary West, Wilmington, N. C. 

Ethel Skabrook Chowder 

Henderson, N. C. 

daughter of 

Ethel Seabuook Dorsey, Henderson, N. C. 




Mi 
f 



Ninety-nine 










Sketch Club 

Peggy Clakkson President 

Susan Eewin Vice President 

Mildred Price Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

• Andrus Henderson 

Cameron, T. Hobbie 

Clakkson Kramer 

Curtis May. J. 

Erwix Noble 

Foley Phuitt 

Hallyburtoh Ticker. S. 
Wheaton 






V 






Oue Hundred 




Senatus Populisque Romanus 

Colors: Purple and Gold Flower: Iris 

Motto: Nil Dcsperandum Horace 

Frances Jordan Consul 

Mattie Sue Taylor Prcetor 

Eleanor Gibson Censor 

Mable Tate Aedile 

Miss Siiapcott Faculty Adviser 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Mr. "Way Miss Holt Miss McKimmon 

Miss Alberston Miss Monroe Miss Roberts 

MEMBERS 

Arciibei.l. M. Fairfax, S. Little, M. 

Ac.ee, E. Fox, M. McKinney, 0. 

Boiiannon, A. Garrett, H. Noble, S. 

Burrage, N. Gibson, E. Oestman. M. 

Cautiien, E. Gregory. J. Smith, P. 

Comer, B. Haigh, F. Stewart 1 _S^^^~' 

Cornick, V. Hamilton, F. Tate, M. 

Cross, M. Harding. P. Taylor, M. S. 

Crowder. E. Harris, E. F. Taylor, V. 

Curtis, C. Hazell. N. Thorkberry, E. 

Doar, H. Hoyt, B. Webb, E. 

East. E. Jordan, F. Wiley, E. 

Eaton, R. Laverty, A. Williams, E. 

One Hundred One 










'H. E. R. 



Motto : 



■It 



with a"" 



President Mary Maruarkt Mi'se "Jennie" 

Honorary Member "Connie" 

Margaret Burckmyer "Peggy" 

Alice Cason "Maky 1- 

Martha Crudup "Mittie" 

Louise Joyner "Joy" 

Elizabeth Johnson "Auntie'' 

Frances Marriner "France" 

Jennie Trotter "S. M." 

Stella Wolfe "S. A." 



X (the great unknown) 

Ambition: IT 

MEMBERS 

Lya Nancy Burraire 

Clay Clara Curtis 

Shir Shirley Noble 

Libby Elizabeth Thornberry 

Tuck Caroline Tucker 



Four Wise (Ga.) Cracks 



Emily Hallyburton 
Sara Redding 
Annie Autrey 
Isabella Clarke 



Nicknames — "HaMie,' 



"Is: 



"Sallie," "Snoot" 



and 



Password — You bet we're from Georgia ! 
Flowers — Bachelor Buttons and Forget-me-not-- 
Place of meeting — Anywhere on the slv 



-One Hundred Two 



R. I. P. 

Motto: To strive not to cut 
COLOR: Blond red FLOWER: Bleeding Heart 

Dr. HoRgard "Hoggie" 

Dr. Smith "Pip" 

Dr. Thigpen "This" 

Dr. Cason "Makey" 

Dr. Parrott " "Polly" 

Dr. Hiiitt "Billie" 

Dr. Street "Geedee" 

Dr. Rodman "Olz" 

Dr. Havne "Sue" 

Dr. Reitzel "Babe" 

Dr. Reynolds "Lib" 

Dr. Norton "Squark" 

Dr. Andrus "Pussy" 

Dr. Oestmann "No. 12" 

Dr. Little "Scoop" 

Dr. Hardin .. "Bill" 

Dr. Wimberlv "Pete" 

Dr. Garrett * "Ree" 



A. I. E. 

Flower: Weeping Willow Color: Blue 

Motto : N'Importe 

President Tiny Battle 

Vice President Gray Johnston 

Secretary-Treasurer Polly Parrott 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Annie Harbert Lamb 
Helen Cannon 



Appalachian Club 

Motto: An Apple a day keeps the doctor away 

Chronic Ailment — Appleplexy 

Custodian of the Apples Helen Dortch 

Crab Apple Prances Brown 

Wine Sap Martha Jones 

Limbertwig... „ Ree Garrett 

Lady Apple Rebekah Waddell 

Green Apple Ellen Lewis 

Adam's Apple Laura Owens 




.u 



One Hundred Three 



sit D&#4.> ' 

Urn- " \i f\< ' 









Sigma Alpha Chi 



Color: 
J [otto: 



Red 

Be yourself 



MKMBERS 
Anne Browder 
Jackie Lawrence 
Mildred Mathieson 
May Creecy Webb 
Edythe Barker 
Rozelle Sloore 
Evelyn Beacliam 
Florence Matthews 
Anna Mac Redfern 



Opin Four-um 

Women of the World 
JIotto: Seez oil, Noze oil 
Mascot': Nize Baby 

United Prezz Mar£ 

Taylor Times Virgie 

Pall "= Phibbie 

F ' ch ° Piatt 



W. G. E. Club 

Motto: We've got everything 

Faith Mary Thurman 

H °Pe "Boots" Badhara 

Charity Dando 






"V 



One Hundred Four 




One Hundred Five 



Sigmas 1926-1927 

Colors: Red and While 

Margaret Godfrey President 

Virginia Evans Vice President 

Mary Thurman Secretary and Treasurer 

Mary Tiicrman Manager of Basketball 

Virginia Evans Manager of Volleyball 

Caroline Tucker Manager of Track 

Etta Taylor Manager of Tennis 

Arcaua Fleming Manager of Swim m ing 

Margaret Cameron Cheer Leader 

Caroline Ticker Cheer Leader 













FACULTY MEMBERS 










Miss Alexander 


Mrs. Marriott 


Miss Rues 1 








Miss Holt 


Miss Shapcott 


Miss Weedon 








Miss Davis 


Miss Riley 


MADAME SlMBOLI-ATl 








Miss Cheatham 


Miss Nicholson 


Miss Fielding 








AGEE, E. 


Glenn, R. 


Norton, Y. 








Aiken, F. 


Glover, S. 


Oakley, d. 








Badham, II. 


Godfrey, M. 


Oestmann, M. 








Baily, J. 


Graham, E. 


Parrish, M. C. 








Baily, M. 


Green, E. 


Peniok, m. 








Baylor, I. 


Haioh, F. 


Pitt. M. B. 








Beach am, E. 


Hardin, C. 


Platt. K. 








Bklvin, M. 


Hardin. M. 


Rankin. A. 








BOGGESS, T, 


Harding, p. 


Read. M. 








Booth, H. 


Harris, M. 


Redding, S. 








Brown, M. 


Hay, H. 


Redfer.v. A. 








BlTRGERT, J. 


Hazell, N. 


Reitzkl, e. 








BUBRAGE, N. 


Hi ATT. L. 


Reynolds. L. 








Byrd, L. 


HoitniE, F. 


Rimmer. M. 








Cameron, M, 


Hoover, M. 


Ritter, L. 








Cameron, T. 


Hoyt, B. 


Rose, M. 








Cason, A. 


HUIE, M. 


Shelton, A. P. 








Cauthen, E. 


Johnson, .1. 


Shore, F. 


[ --.'. ^B 


£ft£ 




Clarke, I. 


Jones, M. D. 


Street, Y. 


■T^- 






Clarkson, M. 


Joyner, L. 


Taylor, E. 


',--3=^ 


j*iy 


Cornhk. V. 
Cross, M. IT. 


Kramer. E. 
Lawton, C. 


Taylor, M. S. 
Thomas, E. 


j|S 




«W«* 




Chowder, E. 


Love, H. 


Thornherry, E. 




} 


ffl KB ': 


Crudup, M, 


Either. A. 


Thurman, M. 




• 


m* 


i- 


Curtis, C. 


Marks. C. 


Trotman, M. S. 




I i 


■ ■ 


Doar, H. 


Marrinkr, F. 


Trotter, J. 




?:&■■ 




Dunn, M. 


Mathis, E. 
Matthews, F. 
Mm miner. L. 


Tucker, C. 
Tucker, S. 

Tyson, Y. 








Evins. S. 








Fleming, a. 


Montgomery, m. 


Warren. A. C. 




i 


Fowlkes, F. 


Moore, R. 


White. M. L. 






Freeman, a. 


Muse, M. 


Williams, E. 






~ 


Gailliard, J. 


McGii.l, A. 


Wolfe. S. 


■ 




<. 
\ 


GALLOWAY, M. 


Mi Gil, i- B. 


Workman, M. 






Garrett, H. 


Kei SON, M. 


Tale, D. 


&i- 


s 






Gibson, E. 




y/OUNG, s. 



One Hundred Six 




One Hand fed Seven 










I p I; 














,*. i 








Mr ^ i W ' > 


fc,' 1 


ill 




nkCr ' w^^K^^ 




"irli 


1 


MU 




-^ 


dttk i 








■ E.J 


iffif 


|7 


1 JH(\ , 




SIGi^A 


^1 





\ 



Out- Hundred Eight 




Forwards — 

Godfrey, M., Capt. 
Thukman, M. 



Sigma Basketball 

FIRST TEAM 
Guards — 

Norton, V. 

Wolfe, S. 



Jumping Center — Ri'iter, L. 
Side Center — Evans, V. 




pi/ 

Center— HocoSrd 

ter — Mitchell 



1927 



One Hundred N"ine 













One Hundred Eight 




Forwards — 

Godfrey, M.. Cajit. 
Turkman. M. 



Sigma Basketball 

FIRST TEAM 
Guards — 

Norton, V. 
Wolfe, S.' 



Jumping Center — Rliter, L. 
Side Center — Evans, V. 




Forwards — 

Johnston. A. G. 
Weaver, M„ Capt. 



Mu Basketball 

FIRST TEAM 
Guards — 

Hamilton, F. 
Rovall, M. 



Jumping Center — Hoggakd 
Side,^Center— Mitchell 



One Hundred Nine 



m 




Sigma Volley Ball Team 




One Hundred Tea 




Swimming Pom. 




s 



Tennis 



V& 















One Hundred Eleven 




Sigma and Mu Track 



Margaret Montgomery 
Julia Pugii 
Prances Brown 
Elizabeth Hoggard 



Frances Hamilton 
Etta Taylor 
Mela Royal 



Lalra Owens 
Leslie Ritteu 
Margaret Godfrey 
Peggy Birckmyek 




One Hundred Tu-olvo 



Mu Songs and Yells 



Sigma Songs and Yells 



M-U that's the way to spell it, 
Ray Mu! That's the way to yell it I 
Team! Team! Team I 

The Mu Team will win and we'll yell with all our 

might — 
We'll win tonight and we'll make those Sigma s 

fight. 
We've got the rep, and by gosh, we've got the 

pep; 
We'll beat 'em up mid we'll fight, fight, fight, 

fight. 
On with the Mu Team and help heat 'em up. 
We've got the team, and by gosh, we've got the 

luck, 
And so in this manner, we'll win the banner. 

Bah! Rah! The ole Mu Team! 

Had a little Rooster, 

Set him on the fence. 

He crowed for the Mu Team 

'Cause he had good sense! 

With colors in triumph flashing 

'Mid the strains of victory, 
Poor Sigma's hopes we're dashing 

Into red obscurity. 
Resistless our team sweeps goal ward 

With the fury of our might. 
We'll fight for the name of Mu Team 

Till we win the game tonight. 

Hobble, Gobble, 
Ruzzle, Dazzle. 
Sis-Boom — Hah! 
•Mu Team! 
Mu Team! 
Rail! Rah! Rah! 

Ride on 'em. 
Slide on "em, 

Skate on 'em too. 

Mu Team I Mo T.-am! 

Good for you ! 

On the field, on the floor, 
The dear Mus will always score, 

As The Mu Team goes rolling along. 
We will fight witli our might, 
And 'twill lie a pretty sight, 

As the Mu Team goes rolling along 

Then it's hi! hi! heel 

In the field of victory. 

Shout out your praises loud and strong, 

Where'ere you go ,you will always know 

That the Mu Team goes rolling along! 

That the Mu Team goes rolling along I 



Ray! Ray! Row I Row! 
Siginas, show 'em how 1 

For when the good ole Sigmas fall in line, 
We're going to win the game another time. 
We'll put a bright red banner on the wall, 
For the Sigma, girls can surely play basketball, 
We've got the forwards, guards and centers, too- 
And we'll surely make those Mus look blue — 
Mus look blue. 

Come, on Sigmas, win the game, win the game— 
Goodnight, Musi 

Horse and wagon, horse and wagon — 

Team! Team I Team! 
Locomotive, Locomotive — 

Coach! Coach! Coach ! 

(Tune of Nancy Lee) 
Of all the girls as e'er you know, 
Vebo, Sigma Ho, Yeho, Sigma, Ho! 
There's none like Sigma girls, I trow, 
Yeho! Yeho I Yeho! 



Just watch 'em get the ball and send it down the 

court, 
And every time the Mus advance they stop them 

short, 
And swiftly to the very end the game is fought. 

Yeho! Sigma Ho! Y'ehol 
Chorus; 
The Red and White will wave all glorious, 

Yeho! Yeho! Y r eho I Y'ehol 
The Sigma Team will be victorious, 

Come on, Sigmas, win tonight! 

Say ! 

Sav what? 

That's what! 

What's what/ 

That's what they all say I 

What's what they all say? 

Beat the Mus! 

Beat the Musi 



Fid 



T SONO 



Girls in red and white we're behind y< 

Come on Sigmas, teach them to play ball. 

All the time, girts, never let them find yo 

Don't, let them score at all 1 

We're hound to win, so pass it down 

The court and score, girls, 

Buck them with all your might, 

Jump in and get that ball, 

Don't ever let it fall. 

Come on, Sigmas. win the game 

And Fight! Sigmas! Fight! 

Chorus: 

Fight, Fight, Fight I till the last free throw 



right J Fighti 
Fight, fight, fight, rush along on the fray, 
Drop the ball right throngli that hole. 

Fight! Fight! Fighti 
Come on, Sigmas, you old red and white 
We trust in our team always. 
So play your basketball 
For the Sigma girls, that's all, 
And bring home a win tonight I 

Sigmas ! Fight I 



■<*~J! 



Fight. Fight. Fighti Ml] Hit' lust free throw is rnade'-.. 
Seiut that ball down the court, it's n goal. ^ 
Fight! Fighti Figlnl 




Oue Hundred Thirteen 



Mus 1926-1927 

Colors: Blue and White 

Mildred Weaver ^President 

Annie Gray Johnston Vice President 

Virginia Taylor Secretary and Treasurer 

Polly Parrott Cheer Leader 

Virginia Taylor , Cheer Leader 

Martha Thigpen Cheer Leader 

Elizabeth Hoggard Manager of Basketball 

Virginia Taylor Manager of Volley Ball 

Frances Hamilton Manager of Track 

Laura Owens Manager of Tennis 

Mabel Tate Manager of Swimming 



Miss Cooke 

Miss Lee 

Miss MuKimmon 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Miss Monroe 
Miss Sutton 
Mr. Jones 
Miss Aoee 



Miss Roberts 
Miss Milligan 
Miss Gustafason 




Adams, E. 
Andrus, H. 
Archbell. M. 
Barber, E 
Barker, E. 
Battle, J. 
Bohannon, A. 
Broadhurst, J. 
Brown, F. 
Bryant, A. 
Burckmykr, P. 
Cannon, H. 
Carlton, M. 
Cleve, F. 
Comer, B. 
Curry, S. 
Dando, G. 

HARROW, M, 
DlCKERSON, M. 
DORTCH, II. 

Duff, K. 
Dunn, E. 
East, K. 
Eaton, R. 
Fairfax, S. 
FOLEY, M. 

Freeman, b. 
Gasque, E. 

GODLEY, N. 

Graham, A, L. 
Green, F, 



ROLL 

Gregory, j. 
Gregory, K. 

HALLYBURTON, I* 

Hamilton, F. 
Harris, E. 
Hicks, L. 
Hoggard, E. 
Hooker, P. 

Horne, M. 
.Tames, M. L. 

JKFFRESS, D. 

Johnston, A. G 

Jones, E. 
Jordan, F. 
Knait, F. 
Lancaster, S. 
Laverty, A. 
Lewis, E. 
Lindsey, WC. 
Little, M. 
Macdonald. L. 
Matheson, M. 
May, K. 
Metcalf, II. K. 
Mitchell, V. 

MrKlNNE, 0. 

Noble, S. 
Owens, L. 
Parrott, N. 
Pasteur, I>. 



Peal, V. 
Perry. F. 
Pruitt, B. 

PUGH, J. 

Rodman, O. 
Royall, M. 
Seeley. A. 
Shelton. E. 
Smith, E. 
Smith, P. 
Stair. D. 
Summers. F. 
Tate, M. 
Taylor, V. 
Thigpen, m. 

Tll.I.ERY, M. 

Trknt, E. A. 
Tucker. S. 
Turner, E. 
Turner. N, 
Waddell, R. 
Washuurne, M. 
Weaver, m. 
Webb, E. 
Webb, f. 
Webb. M. C. 

WlrKERSHAM, J. 

Wiley, E. 

WlLLARD, E. 

Williams, M. 
Wimberi.y, F. 






One Hundred Fourteen 




Fl! : / 












One Hundred Fifteen 




Letter Club 

Joyce Broadiiuust President 

Mary Tiiurman Vice President 

Margaret Godfrey Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Aiken Montgomery 

Evans, V. Norton 

Fleming Royai.l 

Huie Tucker. C. 

Lawton Weaver 
Wolfe 






One Hundred Sixteen 



WINDOU 



/ i 



m 










One Hundred Seventeen 






Superlatives 



/^^•OME see upon these pages 
^-^ Spread out to meet your gaze — 
The girls Statistics this year proved 
The best in special ways. 

Here's "Jonnie" Most Original, 
Most Magnetic and again 
Her Popularity's merited — 
For she's everybody's friend. 

There's Dando Most Attractive; 

Most Striking Stella too. 
Without Marriner's Capability 
What would the Stage Coach do? 

"Mary Dick's" Most Lovable. 
Louise the Honor Pride. 
Mela's Influential 
And Best All Pound beside. 



11% ■' 






When e'er there's call for dancing. 
"Piatt" leads "Phoebe" on the floor. 
"Marg's" the Most Athletic 
Simply watch those Sigma's score! 

So thus is placed before you 
Those traits worth honor due ; 
Altogether they would go to make 
The Saint Mary's Ideal, true! 



Harding. 



- . One Hundred Eighteen 







One Hu n il red N i n eteen 



to 




1 



Party Snaps 



One Hundred Twenty 



~=^ 





One Hundred Thirty 




Colonial Ball 



MINUET- 



Ladies 

Martha Thigpen 
Annie Gray Johnston 
Virginia Evans 
Annie Crewe Wariien 
Mary Dickerson 
Angie LUTnER 
Rebekah Waddell 
Piioeiie Harding 



1927 

Gentlemen 
Mary Tiiurman 
Hef.en Cannon 
Elizabeth Platt 
Annie Herbert Lamb 
Betty Comer 
Jennie Trotter 
Peggy Clarkson 
Margaret Cameron 




One Hundred Thirty-one 




One Hundred Thirty-three 










Stage Coach Staff 



One Hundred Thirtj (out 



BANDBOX 




One Hundred Thirty-fire 



1$5 Ifeiv 



i<Ib 



fP 






msss-mrMKs 




Chapel Caps 



Why Girls Leave School 



"Mittie under the radiator; 


Don't wear ear rings — they're vulgar 


Louise on her knees in the hall. 


Don*t wear loud son, its rude; 


Wonder what they're doing 7 


Don't chew gum in public — 


— The Australian Crawl) 


Even in private its crude. 


Polly behind the dresser; 


Don't talk coins to chapel, 


"Lynke" underneath the bed. 


Don't whisper when you ge( in ; 


What on earth are they doing? 


Don't talk loud in the dining room — 


— Hunting something that's dead? 


Any of this would be sin. 



Annie Gray in the closet; 

"Teeny" up on the shelf; 
"Makey" pounds the floor with a broom; 

"Marriner" scolds herself. 

"Piggie" screams out despairing — 

"Z" almost time for the bell;" 
Then "Jnnnie" emerges triumphant, 

Dragging Jennie as well — 

And Miss Cooke and Sutton are breathless. 

With awe, when they hear "Jonnie" bawl, 
"We can all proceed to chape), 

We've found caps for each girl on the hall!" 

E. Johnson. 



Don't s;o past that tree on the walk; 

Don't look at the passers-by ; 
Don't yell to the hoys you know — 

Just be a lady (and sigh ). 

Don't ever walk off the campus; 

Don'l no to the "little store"; 
Don't ever go to the movies — 

Such trifles make Mr. Way sore. 

You can't even wear red flannels. 
Or play the vie after ten. 

We'll dOubtlCSS gO 10 Heaven 

Bui what'll we do till then. 



^> 




i,': i_ 



One Hundred Thirty-six 




=v&,, 



i 




Beware of Ouija 

Yes or no? when mid where? 
And will I meet him soon? 
When will Billy write to me ? 
A "Special" tomorrow noon ? 
Have you any messages? 
Now tell ns, Ouija, do I 
Stop, Becky, you are pushing it. 
I saw yon, so did Sue. 

I didn't either, I declare 

Oh. look what it has said, — 

For Phoebe Harding to he sure 

To took beneath her bed, 

And watch, tonight, for strange queer signs 

hi I lie storage room next door, 

Where u red head villain lies in wait. 

Beware of a creaking floor I 

That night, a little after eight 

Bold Sallie Satterthwaite 

Dressed up and scared Phoebe, who 

Just screamed with all her might I 

Now up the steps came authority fast, 

(■aught Sally in the act, 

And hauled her up before Miss Holt 

And told her of the fact. 

Now learn from this sad story, not 

To credit what Ouija may say, 

For our faithful girl of the Altar Guild 

Was restricted for fourteen days! 

M. Jone 



An English N Senior Aspires 
to the Scenario 



"The California" 
All Starring Cast 






Window Display. 

Screaming Golf Hose — plus fours. 

Tweed — stacomh — pipes zz Assorted Mules 

Passing Review. 

Smart clo'es — spike heels — galoslrpT'park 

ages — giggles — glances = AU Saint Mary" 

Fade Out. 

12:30; Hillsboro Car and chaperones 

proach simultaneously. 

GENERAL MOB SEEN. 

FINIS 




One Hundred Thirty-seven 






K 







e ^ "^" 



"One Hundred Thirty-eight 




One Hundred Thirty-nine 



School Calendar 

SEPTEMBER 

Tuesday-Wednesday, 14-15. Opening days of the Eighty-fifth annual Session; Arrival of 

new girls, Tuesday; return of the old girls, Wednesday. 
Saturday 18. Reception of old girls to new girls in the "Parlor." 
Saturday 25. Reception given hy Sigma Lambdas and E. A .P.'s to new members in 

the "Parlor." 
Monday 27. "Rose Marie" at State Theatre. 

OCTOBER 

Saturday 4. "Bloomer Party" in gym. Mus victorious. 

Monday 24. College Club Tea. 

Saturday 24. Hallowe'en Party in the gym. 

NOVEMBER 

Monday 1. All Saints Day. Founder's Day Program. 

Tuesday 2. "The Student Prince" at the State Theatre. 

Friday 5. Dr. Mini's lecture "Idealism." 

Wednesday 10. Junior Reception. 

Wednesday 10. School Council Supper. 

Friday 12. Mrs. Challen speaks. 

Saturday 13. Track Meet, Mus victorious. 

Monday 15. University of North Carolina Glee Club Concert. 

Saturday 20. Class Parties Seniors to Sophomores in the "Parlor." Juniors to Fresh- 
men on track field. 

Wednesday 24. "Julius Caesar" at State Theatre. 

Thursday 25. Thanksgiving Day. Special services in the Chapel. 

Friday 26. Recital by Music pupils in the Auditorium. 

Saturday 27. Senior Christmas Dance. 

Tuesday 30, Rhonda Welsh Singers. 



£\ - -■■■■■> lr*%?' 

life 



» 



."'i 






■ : ': --'^ 






DECEMBER 

Thursday 1. Expression Recital. 

Saturday 3. First Basketball Game. Sigmas victorious. 

Tuesday 7. E. A. P. Model Meeting. 

Thursday 9. Sigma Lambda Model Meeting. 

Saturday 11. Basketball Game. Sigmas victorious. 

Tuesday 14. Reception to Sophomores. 

Saturday 16. Senior play followed by Christmas tree entertainment in the gym. 

Sunday 17. Carol services in the Chapel. 

Monday IS. Christmas Holidays begin. 



\ 



JANUARY 

Thursday 6. Return of students after Christmas holidays. 

Saturday 15. Basketball Game. Mus victorious. 



i inf Hundred Forty 



Wednesday-Saturday 19-22. Examinations. 
Saturday 22. Cotillion Club Dance. 



Saturday 


5. 


Monday 


7. 


Saturday 


12. 


Wednesday 


16. 


Thursday 


17. 


Saturday 


19. 


Monday 


2 9 


Saturday 


27. 


Tuesday 


2 


Wednesday 


3. 


Thursday 


4. 


Saturday 


26. 



FEBRUARY 

Class Parties. Sophomores to the Seniors in the "Parlor" and Fresh- 
men to the Juniors in the gym. 
Raleigh Male Chorus in the "Parlor." 
Basketball Game. Mus victorious. 
Address by Dr. H. H. Powers on "China." 
Miss Alberston's Reception to the Freshmen and the Preps. 
Basketball Game. 
Sketch Club Tea. 
Cotillion Club Dance. 

MARCH 
Colonial Ball. 

Ash Wednesday. Special services in the Chapel. 
Students Recital. 
Double Header Volley Ball games. Sigmas victorious. 



APRIL 

Saturday 9. Gym Tournament. 

Friday 15. Good Friday. 

Sunday 17. Easter Day. Appropriate services in the Chapel. 



Monday 


2. 


Monday 


9. 


Thursday 


12. 


Saturday 


14. 


Saturday 


21. 


Saturday 


2S. 



MAY 
Swimming Meet. 
May Day. 

Alumnie Day. Eighty-fifth anniversary of Founding of Saint Mary's* 
Junior-Senior Banquet at the Sir Walter Hotel. 
School Party in the "Parlor." 
Commencement Play. 




One Hundred Forty-oii' 



Acknowledgment 



' I M-IE Stage Coach owes its existence to the cooperation of Mr. Way. Miss 
A Alberston, Miss Katie and Miss Sutton. It owes much to the interest, en- 
couragement and help of Miss Holt and to the experience and good advice of Mr. 
Tucker. We are very grateful to them. 

Mrs. Marriott has been the loyal friend of the Seniors, the school and the Annual. 
We could not have done without her. 

We wish to thank Miss Holt and Miss Houelien for their assistance in grouping 
the pictures. 

For art work we wish to thank Emily Hallyburton and Helen Badhani ; for 
general help, especially in taking snaps, Sallie Lancaster and Mary Read; for her 
willingness and efficient service, our typist, Margaret Godfrey; for the tireless 
energy experienced in the "Little Store," the Senior Class; for making the "Little 
Store" a success, the school. 

We appreciate the interest of the advertisers and we are glad that they realize 
the worth of their investment. 

And above all, we appreciate the personal interest, the capable direction and 
patience of Mr. Beck of Edwards & Broughton Co. 




^> 



One Hundred Forty-two 




RALEIGH MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION 



' V^JHE following pages of advertising 
\*S have been placed in the annual by 
the various merchants of Raleigh in the 
hope of not merely individual gain, but in 
the realization that a greater cooperative 
spirit in all things pertaining to Raleigh 
enterprises will be fruitful of better things 
both for the student bodies and the Raleigh 
Merchants. 

We hope that while you peruse these pages 
you will realize that the Raleigh Merchants 
Association and its members appreciate 
fully the good will of each student in this 
college. 



C. C. GUNN 
A. M. BECK N. H. McLEOD 

Good Will Committee 



RALEIGH MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION 




THE NEW 



"WHlie Shop ofOriginaJj^dQs'm^ 






1 A — SHOPS .INC. ~~>M 






J 



Under New Management 
112 FayetU-ville Slreel 



New Policy 



New Owners 



Very Moderately Priced 
A Complete Line of 
MISSES' AND WOMENS' APPAREL AND MILLINERY 
A 10% discount will be given to all students and teachers of the St. 
Marys School on any purchase. 



BYNUM PRINTING COMPANY 



BETTER PRINTING 
Phone 692-693 Raleigh. N. C. 

Buy where you live and you will live better 



Exclusive But Not Expensive 


We lake this op purl units' to 


Eliza B. Enniss 
Corset and Lingerie 


express our appreciation to 
the faculty and Students of 

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 


Shop 


for their patronage during the 
season just ended. 


GIRDLES 


We uish you all a pleasant 


HOSE 


vacation. 


BRASSIERES 


Athletic Supply Co. 


NOVELTIES 


206 Salisbury St., 




Raleigh, N. C. 


SILK UNDERGARMENTS 


Carolina's Largest Sporting Goods 


L07 Fayetteville St. 


Store 


C. D. Arthur 


Fresh Every Hour 


Established 1886 




Headquarters for 


""Wilson's Sandwiches 


SEA FOOD OF ALL KINDS 


Are Delicious" 


Stall No. 1, New City Market 


DEMAND 


Terms : Cash 


WILSON'S PRODUCTS 


Phone 255 Raleigh, N. C. 


AND YOU GET THE BEST 



:< J* 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning 


and Dyeing Company 


OLDEST AND BEST 


Main Office: 13 S. Wilmington Street 


Cor. Blount and Martin Sts. Plant 414-416 Gale St. 


Raleigh, N. C. 


Jt Jt 


J* ..* 




Alderman & Co. 


Hotel Sir Walter 


We Handle Only the Best 


Raleigh, N. C. 


in 


240 Rooms 240 Baths 


CANDIES 


Every Modern Convenience 


also 


GRIFFIN & BLAND HOTEL 


National Biscuit Cakes 


COMPANY 
Props. 


Raleigh, N. C. 






< J* 


■< ,"* 





WE ARE FOR 



SAINT MARY'S 



Edwards-Cain Drug Co. 



Two Squares from the Campus 





The 


IF IT IS A HAT YOU NEED 


PEACOCK ALLEY 


Misses Reese & Co., 


TEA ROOM 


206 Masonic Temple 


Caters In Discriminating 


Second Floor 


Palates 


IS THE PLACE TO BUY IT 


"The proof of the padding is in 
the eating" 


10% Discount 






\27\-j Favetleville St. 




Phone 328 


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THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS 


FINISHING HARDWARE, GUNS AND 


SPORTING GOODS 


A SPECIALTY 


"THE BIG HARDWARE MEN" 


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THE BUS 

is 

THE BEST 

WAY TO TRAVEL 

TO— 

Durham, Chapel Mill, Greensboro, 
Rocky Mount, Wilson, Dunn, Fayette- 
ville and intermediate points on the 

CAROLINA COACH COMPANY 
SYSTEM 

You can charter a bus to go any- 
where. For terms ami bookings apply 
at General Office, 510 East Davie St., 
Raleigh. 



R. E. Quinn & Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FURNITURE AND STOVES 

103-10 East Martin Street 

Phone 2136 Raleigh, N. C. 



Eversliarp Pencils. Waterman's Fountain Pens. Kodaks and 

Supplies. Albums. Memory Books. Poems 

Loose Leaf Books 

Stationery 
JAMES E. THIEM 

Phone 135 
Raleigh, N. C. 






Dillon Supply Company 

MILL SUPPLIES 

MACHINERY 

Modern Machine Shop 

QUALITY AND SERVICE DID IT 



Phones 752-753 



Raleigh, N. C. 



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W. L. BROGDEN CO., 

Raleigh, N. C. 
WHOLESALE FRUIT AND PRODUCE 



BONNIE BEAUTY SALON 

For 

PERMANENT WAVING, MARCELS, FACIALS 
SCALP TREATMENT, BOBBING 

Special Rates for College Girls 
Telephone 2569 



ROYSTER'S 
Fine Candies 

Almost as Old as 
Saint Mary's Itself 






MAY TIME 




Time to "join-hands" on that 
electric installation work you need 
— ask us now about costs, etc. 

Summers Electrical 
Company 

112 W. Martin Street 



VISIT OUR RETAIL BRANCH 

120 South Salisbury Street 

For the Best in Fancy Cukes and Pastries nj All Kinds 

INSIST ON 

BUTTER KRUST 

Bread and Cakes 

The Quality Supreme Kill Be Found in Our 

BREAD, PIES AND CAKES 
SOLD EVERYWHERE 

STAUDT'S BAKERY 



Established 1396 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Geo. Marsh Company 



INCORPORATED 



WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 
FINE FOOD PRODUCTS 

Raleigh, N. C. 



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THE 

LADIES' SHOP 
Fine Millinery 

14 East Hargett Street 
10', Off to School Girls 



UNIVERSALLY 

ACCEPTED AS 

THE BEST 



A THE TRADE MAWX KNOWN IK EVERY HOMg 






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MEW BRITAIN. Lwnr 



Electric Appliances 




WBSS 



Whether it's a curling iron, electric grill, percolator. 
or any of llie numerous Electrical home needs. Universal 
appliances are known for their dependability. No other 
appliance is more beautiful in design or constructed of 
more lasting material. Ask for the best and you'll get 
an Universal. 

ON DISPLAY IN ANY OF OUR STORES 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

"Caterers to Sainl Mary's jar 27 Years" 

EFFICIENT SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

MODERNLY EQUIPPED LUNCHEONETTE 

DELICIOUS HOME MADE CANDIES 



PHONE 36 
111 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



WARREN'S TRANSFER 

Opposite Lhiion Station 

Automobiles for Hire 

Special Rates for 
OUT-OF-TOWN TRIPS 
301 West Martin Street 

Phone 538 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



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J. J. FALLON 




COMPANY 


SEE 


FLORISTS 


Herbert 


Largest Growers of Flowers in 
North Carolina 


Rosenthal 


FLOWERS 




Properly Selected 


REAL PUMPS 


Properly Clustered 




Properly Presented 




J. J. FALLON COMPANY 




203 Fayetteville Street 


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EAT AT 




VURNAKES 




THE PLACE WHERE YOUTH 


J. B. ROGERS 


MEETS 


Raleigh, North Carolina 


Fayetteville Street 




Raleigh, North Carolina 




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RALEIGH'S ORIGINAL SOURCE OE 
SMART APPAREL 



Raleigh's J? === tj *\ 126 

Smartest 

Shop ^f,^~ ' = ^ Raleigh. A'. C. 



f EMSBERGSJ — 

*^». — ^* Raleigh. 



College Girls naturally gravitate to this store 

lured by trie exquisite 

Coals : Frocks : Millinery : Suits and Wraps 

That make this store irresistible to the smart dressers 

To suit your individual requirements 



"Raleigh" a Good Shopping Center 
WHERE TO SHOP 

ALFRED WILLIAMS COMPANY 

Established 1867 

Is the outstanding store for your needs in approved Stationery. 

All the New Books, excellent display of Cards, Novelties. 

We are delighted to have you call. 

119 Fayetteville Street 

EASTMAN KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 



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LIVELY AND SNAPPY 








FOOTWEAR 
for 






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] 




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1 


COLLEGE GIRLS 




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Reasonable Prices 

Roscoe Griffin Shoe 


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Company 




120 Fayetteville Street 




Raleigh, N. C. 


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Richmond Meat 


WHEN IN NEED 


Market 


OF ANYTHING 


L. SCHWARTZ, Manager 


ELECTRICAL 


DEALER IN 


Call to See Our Complete Line 


CHOICE MEATS 


Demonstration Gladly Made 


SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY 


Thompson 


City Market 


Electrical Co. 


Raleigh, North Carolina 


132 Fayetteville Street 


P. 0. Box 354 


Phone 370 



Need a Marcel? Permanent? Manicure? Facial? 
GO TO 

BROWN'S BEAUTY PARLOR 

ALL THE LATEST BOBS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 
EXPERT SERVICE 

127 Phone 2153 

Fayetteville Street West Hargett Street 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



EFIRD'S 

RALEIGH'S BUSIEST STORE 

Always selling what you want for less money 
Show thrift and make Mother and Father glad by shopping at 

EFIRD'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

Raleigh's Bargain Center 



HUDSON-BELK COMPANY 

Raleigh's Welcome Store 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Students and their parents find it one of their pleasures to shop in 
Raleigh's downtown district. A visit to our great department store at 
any time will acquaint you with the newest fashions. 

We cash students's checks and 
offer every service for con- 
venience of the shopper. 

ONE OF THE 44. BELK STORES IN THE 
CAROLINAS AND VIRGINIA 



Better Wearing Apparel for Ladies and Misses 

Brotan 's 



103 Fayelteville Street 



COATS 
SKIRTS 



SUITS 

WAISTS 

MILLINERY 



DRESSES 
SWEATERS 



'Raleigh's Style Center" 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 

ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT OUR STORE 

Leaders in AIL High. Grade Toilet Goods 
Try Us First 

Agents for Hollingsworth Fine Candies 

BOON-ISELEY DRUG COMPANY 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



EXCLUSIVE BUT NOT EXPENSIVE 



STYLISH— YOUTHFUL 
APPAREL 

FOR THE 

COLLEGE MISS 

AND 

JUNIOR WOMEN 

HOSIERY, GLOVES AND 
OTHER ACCESSORIES 

All of Substantial Quality — 
Exclusive but not expensive 




RALEIGH'S LEADING 
BEAUTY SHOP 

Presided over by Mrs. Cadmus 
Beauty Expert of Many Years 
Experience 
Hair Bobbing in the Latest Styles 
Marcel and Permanent Waving 
BEAUTY CULTURE 
Special Every Thursday our regular 
$1.50 Facials for -31.00 

Mezzanine Floor 



fan Droflkers 




Fayetteville St. 



Phone 704 and 705 



Raleigh, N. C. 



BRANTLEY'S DRUG STORE 

The Place to Meet Your Friends 

Agent for "ELIZABETH ARDEN" 

Our 

SODAS AND ICE CREAMS 

Are Always Best 



Telephones 14 and 15 




RALEIGH'S FOREMOST APPAREL SHOP 
FOR WOMEN AND MISSES 

A Store where you are assured of finding throughout the season a pleasing 
assortment of all that is new and worth while in 

WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTER GARMENTS 

A Store also with the reputation for courteous treatment, good service 
and fair prices 

We respectfully request an inspection of our merchandise and methods 



COMPLIMENTS 
of the 

STATE 

and 

SUPERBA THEATRES 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Yarborough Hotel 



"Raleigh's Most Famous Hotel" 

Yarborough 
Coffee Shop 



Southern Cusine 



Reasonable Prices 



Richard's 

Coast to Coast 

READY TO WEAR AND 
STYLISH SHOES 



CAPITOL 
THEATRE 

POPULAR PICTURES 
POPULAR PRICES 

"WE BRING THE BIG 

ONES BACK" 


Thig: Virginia is a mighty fine girl 
but she's very loquacious. 

Franky: And, besides, she talks too 
much. 


"I sho do envy Freda Knapp when 
she laughs." 

"Why? 11 

"Because there is so much of her 
having a good time!" 

"Poor May Creecy must lead a sad 
life!" 


THE ART FLOWER 
SHOP, Inc. 

FLOWERS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

130 Fayetteville St. 
Phone 207 

We Wire Flowers Anywhere 



YOUTHFUL FOOTWEAR 



Quality 
$7.00 




Style 

$7.00 



EACH NEW DAY BRINGS A NEW STYLE 

COMET SHOE COMPANY 

Next to California Fruit Store 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HORTON'S STUDIO 



The Very Best in 
Photography 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGPiAPHER 

FOR 

THE STAGE COACH 



TAYLOR'S 



The Show Place of the Carolinas 



WE WILL AND DO SELL YOU BETTER GOODS 
FOR THE SAME MONEY 





Dresses 






Furs 






Hosiery 




Coats 


Underwear 


Novelties 


Millinery 


Neckwear 


Sportwea 



JEWELRY 



CONFIDENCE 



The young ladies of Saint Mary's who are sensi- 
tive to quality appeal and those who instinctively 
buy where complete confidence may be placed are 
among our most welcome customers. 

It is ever the policy of this Company to continue 
to merit such confidence by constant attention to 
the proper relation of quality and price. 



Boylan-Pearce Company 

"Raleigh's Shopping Center'" 



Dwor sky's 



MILE 
FROM 
HIGH 
PRICES 



A SUPERB STOCK OF DIAMONDS 

AND WATCHES 

FLAT AND HOLLOW WARE IN 

STERLING AND SHEFFIELD 

FINE CUT GLASS AND JEWELRY 

REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 

QUALITY JEWELRY 



Anna Bryant: What tense would it be if I said "I am handsome"? 

Louise Joyner: Present, child. 

Anna (scornfully): Na-a-avv it would be Pre-tense! 



Edythe Barker: Miriam, doesn't Easter come on Sunday? 

Miriam Hardin: Of course it does. 

Edythe: Law Honey! I knew that boy was dumb — writing up here 
to say he'll see me Easter Monday! 



But the prize for the year goes to the new girl who believed East Rock 
to be the traditional stone upon which Mr. Smedes stepped when he first 
rolled up in the groves of "stately oak trees"! 



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